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Recipients Say Award Helps Reach Career Goals

By Micki Steele, The Detroit News

June 16, 2010

 

  Sharde Fleming hopes to one day ran a halfway house for offenders to help them return to society. And with help from the Rosa Parks Scholarship Foundation, she says she'll learn the necessary skills in college.

  "The scholarship helps me get closer to my dreams," said the Renaissance High School graduate, who will attend Howard University. "Without it, I wouldn't be able to attend." Fleming was among 42 Michigan seniors chosen from 600 applications to receive a $2,000 scholarship from the foundation, established in 1980 by The Detroit News, Detroit Public Schools and the Butzel Long law firm. More than 900 graduates have been awarded $1.8 million.

  The winners will be honored at a luncheon Wednesday at the Charles H. Wright Museum of African American History. The ceremony will feature speeches by former scholarship winners Jamal Simmons, who has a master's degree from Harvard University and worked as a CNN political analyst during the 2008 presidential campaign, and E'Lois Thomas, deputy finance director for the city of Dearborn. "I wouldn't have been able to pay for college without the help of the foundation," Simmons said.

  Students receive scholarships based on financial need, application essay, community service, academic performance, SAT/ACT scores and career goals.

  The number of applicants jumped 33 percent from 2009, making it difficult to pick winners.

  "It was grueling," said Delora Hall-Tyler, president of the foundation and president of First Media Group in Detroit. "You find children in amazing circumstances - so many were casualties of the economic downturn - and they're over comers."

 

 

40 Empowered by Civil Rights Legacy

By Marisa Schultz, The Detroit News

June 16, 2009

 

  Detroit - Clarence Houston may not face the same battle for respect as Rosa Parks did decades ago, but the 18-year-old says the civil rights icon's bravery motivates him to be a role model to his younger siblings and others.

  "Like Rosa, I have had enough," the Finney High School valedictorian wrote. "Enough of young people being involved in senseless violence, enough of education being secondary and running in the streets being first." Houston was among 40 Michigan seniors chosen to receive a $2,000 college scholarship through the Rosa Parks Scholarship Foundation. Since 1980, more than 800 high school seniors have received more than $1.6 million in scholarships from the foundation, established by The Detroit News, the Detroit Public Schools and Butzel Long law firm.

  The winners will be honored Wednesday at the Charles H. Wright Museum of African American History. The luncheon will feature remarks by Judge Wade Harper McCree of Wayne County 3rd Circuit Court and performances by the Mosaic Youth Theatre of Detroit and recording artist Jerald Daemyon, who will play violin.

  Students receive scholarships based on financial need, academic performance, ACT/SAT test scores, community involvement and an essay on how Parks influenced their lives.

  Choosing winners from a, group of students who often overcome many obstacles to graduate is challenging, said Delora Hall Tyler, foundation president.

 

 

Scholarship Reflects Parks' Goal of Opportunities for Everyone

By Jennifer Mrozowski, The Detroit News

June 9, 2008

 

  LaShawn Etheridge is moving from Detroit to go to college this fall, but she doesn't intend to forget her hometown. "One of my goals is to come back to the inner-city Detroit area and build a recreational center in the community," said Etheridge, 18, who plans to become a child psychologist after graduating from Kalamazoo College. "I just feel that children who don't have things to do get involved in the wrong things. By building a recreational center... that will give students positive things to do."

  Etheridge, a graduating senior from Martin Luther King Jr. Senior High School in Detroit, is one of 40 students to receive a $2,000 college scholarship through the Rosa Parks Scholarship Foundation.

  Since 1980, more than 800 high school seniors have received more than $1.6 million in scholarships from the foundation, established by The Detroit News and the Detroit Public Schools. Two additional students who are aspiring journalists were selected as Detroit News/Rosa Parks scholars. The News sponsors scholarships for the students, who will enroll into the Journalism Institute for Media Diversity at Wayne State University.

  The newspaper sponsors an awards luncheon and provides administrative support for the program. The foundation also benefits from administrative and legal services by the Butzel Long law firm of Detroit.

  Students receive scholarships, awarded by the foundation's board, based on financial need, academic performance, ACT/SAT test scores, community service and an essay on how Parks influenced their lives. More than 320 students applied for the scholarships.

  "Rosa Parks devoted her life to creating access and opportunities for everyone, and the Rosa Parks Scholarship Foundation's goal is a reflection of that," said Delora Hall Tyler, president of the foundation. "With the passing of Mrs. Parks, we feel it is more important than ever to continue her legacy by helping young people meet their educational goals, which in turn allows them to achieve a better life."

  Etheridge, like many of the scholarship recipients, is accomplished and community-minded. She was a member of the National Honor Society, played for the King High marching and symphonic bands, studied Chinese and French and participated in the Wayne State University Math Corps program, where she tutored and mentored seventh- and eighth-graders. It was her experiences mentoring younger students that contributed to her desire to become a child psychologist.

  She said she's honored to have been awarded the Rosa Parks scholarship. "I'm extremely grateful and appreciative of the scholarship because it will definitely help with cost of college education," she said.

 

 

Students Shine with Parks' Qualities

The Detroit News

June 13, 2007

 

  For years, Tayuanna Norman hoped to help kids succeed in life by becoming a teacher.

  But after spending a day with her aunt, a social worker, Norman, 18, saw how she could help children in other ways. She now wants to follow her aunt into social work. "If a child is in a threatening situation and you remove them from that harm, you're helping them succeed, too," she said.

  Norman is one of 42 Michigan high school graduates who will receive a $2,000 Rosa Parks Scholarship.

  Norman, who will attend Grand Valley State University, said she is honored to receive the scholarship named for the civil rights hero who stood up to segregation in Alabama in 1955. Before Parks died, in 2005, Norman had a chance to meet her. "She was quite a phenomenal woman," said Norman, a graduate of Martin Luther King Jr. High School in Detroit.

  Since 1980, the Rosa Parks Scholarship Foundation has awarded more than $1.6 million to more than 800 high school seniors. Recipients of the scholarship are chosen for their outstanding academic achievement, community ser-vice, leadership and commitment to the principles of Rosa Parks.

  In addition to the 40 traditional scholarships, two students were named Detroit News Scholars and will enroll in the Journalism Institute for Minorities program at Wayne State University. They are Ilissa Gilmore of Detroit Renaissance High School and Isaac Elster of University of Detroit Jesuit High.

  Delora Hall Tyler said she relishes the Parks scholarships because they are not based solely on grades and test scores. Tyler, president of the foundation and the First Media Group, said many recipients have jobs and are helping to raise siblings, Tyler said. ?We're giving the other kids a chance," she said. "With a little bit of encouragement, they may be the ones who change the world."

  Alonzo King may be one of those who do just that. A graduate of Detroit Northwestern, King has had an affinity for computers since ninth grade. A teacher ignited his interest when he gave students computers to take home - but only after they had taken them apart and put them back together. No problem. "I understand how a computer works," said King, 18. By his senior year, King was vice president of the Achievement in Motion club that helped train other students - and some teachers - to use personal digital assistants. King will attend Eastern Michigan University this fall to study computer engineering.

  The foundation receives support from The Detroit News, the law firm Butzel Long and the accounting firm Follmer Rudzewicz PLC.

 

 

40 Michigan Students Earn Honors

By Chrystal Johnson, The Detroit News

June 12, 2006

 

  Adrienne Carter, 17, lost both of her parents by the time she was 3 years old. Her older brother, Calvin Sanders, and his friend, Barbara Welsh, whom Carter calls a godsend, are the only parents she knows. Still, Carter wishes her biological parents were here to witness her accomplishments, because they have been her motivation throughout the years.

  "God placed her (Welsh) here for a reason," said Carter, Detroit Northwestern High School's valedictorian. "She says that I have to do good so that I can be successful in life. I wanted to make my (biological) parents proud." Carter, who will study accounting at Hampton University in Hampton, Va., this fall, is one of 40 Michigan students who have been awarded $2,000 scholarships from the Rosa Parks Scholarship Foundation.

  The foundation has awarded more than $1.5 million to more than 750 students since it was established in 1980 by The Detroit News and Detroit Public Schools. The foundation's board awards students the scholarships based on community service, financial need and academic achievement.

  In addition, The News sponsors scholarships for two aspiring journalists, as well as an awards luncheon for the Rosa Parks Scholars and their families. The newspaper also provides administrative support for the program.

  The Butzel Long law firm of Detroit contributes administrative and legal service to the foundation.

  The 2006 scholarship recipients are from diverse backgrounds, representing countries such as Brazil, Bosnia and Albania. More than half of the scholarship recipients are from single-parent homes.

  Umar Henry, 17, of Detroit, who will use his prize money for tuition at the Wharton School of the University of Pennsylvania, plans to study international business. He cherishes a quote from Parks on which he patterns his life: "Each person must live their life as a model to others."

  Parks, who died late last year, re-fused to surrender her bus seat to a white man in segregated Montgomery, Ala., in 1955. Her actions helped earn her the nickname "mother of the civil rights movement."

  Rosa Parks Scholarship recipient Lucas Fratta, 19, who plans to attend Michigan State University in the fall as a mechanical engineering major, said, "My will to voice my opinion, protest for my rights, and finding myself in difficult scenarios makes me, I believe, a Rosa Parks Scholar."

  Scholarship winners will receive their awards during a banquet Thursday.

 

 

Rosa Parks Scholars Triumph Over Adversity Forty high school grads are lauded for embodying the civil rights icon's persistence and courage.

By Kara G. Morrison, The Detroit News

June 21, 2005

 

  At age 15, Krystal Owens lost her mother to lung disease. She lived briefly with her drug-de-pendent father until he was imprisoned. Then she bounced among foster homes for three years.

  The hardships didn't over-whelm her. Instead, the experiences "made me so anxious to get to my ultimate goal, to help someone make it through all the struggles I went through," says the Redford teen. "My main focus would be on delinquents, to make sure they're on the right path in life."

  Krystal appears to be well on her way to her dream of becoming Parks a social worker. She recently graduated with honors from Detroit's Renaissance High School and will attend Bowling Green State University this fall. Krystal's persistence helped her to become a Rosa Parks scholar. It's a recognition she shares with 39 other high school graduates from across Michigan who won $2,000 scholarships from the Rosa Parks Scholarship Foundation.

  This year marks the 25th anniversary of the organization, which has distributed more than $1.5 million since it was established by The Detroit News and the Detroit Public Schools. Scholarships are awarded based on academic achievement, community service and need.

  Additionally, The News sponsors scholarships for two aspiring journalists. The News also sponsors an awards luncheon for the Rosa Parks Scholarship recipients and their families, as well as provides administrative support.

  The Butzel Long law firm of Detroit contributes administrative and legal services to the foundation. Follmer Rudzewicz Advisors Inc. donates an annual audit.

  Many of the scholarship winners describe Parks as a source of inspiration; her courageous act of civil disobedience (she refused to relinquish her bus seat to a white man in segregated Montgomery, Ala., in 1955) gave birth to the American civil rights movement. "She's a great, great, great role model," Krystal says.

 

 

Rosa Parks Scholarships Aid Students for 25 Years

By Michael H. Hodges, The Detroit News

February 4, 2005

 

  When Chris B. Carswell won a Rosa Parks Scholarship in 1982, the young man suddenly found himself on the fast track.

  Carswell's award -- and his interest in engineering -- caught the eye of a University of Michigan administrator, who knew the Ford Motor Co. was looking for a young engineer to sponsor.

  "So the Rosa Parks Scholarship helped me get a four-year scholarship from Ford and employment with them afterwards," says Carswell, who's now giving back as a board member at the Rosa Parks Scholarship Foundation. He laughs. "So I've done OK."

  Not every Rosa Parks award recipient, of course, ends up with quite Carswell's luck.

  But for 25 years, the awards have given a leg up to more than 750 high-school graduates. Since its founding in 1980 by the Detroit Public Schools and The Detroit News, the foundation has disbursed $1.5 million to deserving students all over Michigan.

  In celebration of this milestone -- and to help raise funds for yet more scholarships -- the foundation is throwing a black-tie party and tribute to Rosa Parks April 30 at The Henry Ford.

  Honorary co-chairs include Gov. Jennifer Granholm, Judge Damon Keith and U.S. Rep. John Conyers.

  In 1980, the foundation awarded just one scholarship. Today, about 40 students a year get $2,000 apiece that they can apply to any college or university.

  Says Carswell, who's in charge of planning for the upcoming event, "I don't know of many organizations that provide as many scholarships to as diverse a group of high-school graduates as ours, where scholars come from both the inner city and the Upper Peninsula."

  Scholars are chosen based on academic achievement, community service and demonstrated leadership.

  The April 30 Henry Ford festivities will include a tribute to Parks, a video presentation on past winners, a silent auction and dinner.

  Tickets are $100 per person.

  Anyone interested in attending can call (313) 222-2538 or inquire via email to rpscholarship@dnps.com.

 

 

Park's Resolve Shines in Students

By Michael H. Hodges, The Detroit News

June 7, 2004

 

  Curtis Tarrany's dad always tells his son not to give up, and to stay grounded.

  "And I do," says the 17-year-old softly. "Yes I do."

  This fall, Curtis will become the first member of his family to go to college. He's attending Bowling Green State University in Ohio, boosted by a $2,000 scholarship from the Rosa Parks Scholarship Foundation.

  Curtis' father always has been the young man's inspiration. The older man has battled sickle cell anemia his whole life. He's lost almost all of his sight, and periodically suffers bouts of wracking pain. He hasn't been able to work for years, and Curtis' mother has to clean houses to keep body and soul together.

  An olny child, Curtis pitches in whenever he can - doing all of the heavy work around the house and holding down an after-school job to contribute to household finances. On top of that, he still finds time to tutor younger students, play varsity football, and excel in Martin Luther King Jr. High Schools math, science and applied technology program.

  Curtis sees in his father's unrelenting spirit some of the courage that fueled Rosa Parks' nation-shakin decision not to yield her seat on a Montgomery, Ala., bus to a white person when ordered. "She was a fighter," he says. "She risked everything."

  So Curtis goes to college in part for himself, in part for his family - and hopes that a little bit of Rosa Parks' resolve flickers in him, as well.

  Curtis is one of 40 high school graduates from across Michigan to win a Rosa Parks Scholarship. The $2,000 grants are awarded based on achievement, grades, community service and need.

  The Detroit News and the Detroit Public Schools established the Parks Foundation in 1980. More than $1 million has gone to 500-plus scholars.

  Additionally, The News sponsors two students hoping to become journalists.

  For the first time this year, the Butzel Long law firm underwrote a scholarship, and is co-sponsoring - along with The News - a luncheon at The Henry Ford for recipients and their families. The Detroit firm has long contributed administrative and legal services to the enterprise. Follmer Rudzewicz Advisors Inc. donates an annual audit for the foundation, which provides scholarships for students who often have roots from around the world.

  For her part, Parks Scholar Zahra Ajrouche, the daughter of Lebanese immigrants, thinks few people can be compared to the legendary civil rights champion.

  "Rosa Parks didn't let anybody put her down," says the 18-year-old who's graduating from Fordson High School with a 3.9 grade point average.

  "Most people are like, 'Whatever,' " she says. "But she stood up for herself. I find that very admirable."

  Zahra, the youngest of nine children who hopes to become a pharmacist, knows a thing or two about standing your ground.

  For a long time after the September 11 attacks, her extended family - including a number of aunts who wear Islamic veils - was the object of unfriendly stares in restaurants and shops. Zahra wears her heritage proudly, and makes no apologies to anybody.

  "You've just got to hold your head high," she says.

 

 

Rosa Parks Scholarships Impart Pride

By Christine McDonald, The Detroit News

March 2, 2004

 

  Students might forget about their college scholarships as soon as the money is spent, but that's not the case for many recipients of the annual Rosa Parks Scholarship Foundation award.

  The award, named after the woman who in 1955 fueled the civil rights movement by refusing to give up her seat on an Alabama bus, remains a point of pride for scholars beyond its $2,000 value.

  Dr. Delani Mann-Johnson remembers when, as a senior at Ypsilanti High School 14 years ago, she added the accolade to her Spelman College application.

  "It meant a lot because of the woman it was named after," said Mann-Johnson, 32, who practices internal medicine in St. Louis and primarily works with the uninsured.

  The foundation is taking applications from a new round of candidates. Michigan high school seniors have until April 1 to apply for the $2,000 one-year grants, which are based on grades, achievements, community service and need.

  Recipients will be notified of the award in May.

  The Detroit News and the Detroit Public Schools set up the Rosa Parks Scholarship Foundation in 1980. It has since granted more than 500 scholarships worth $1 million to students statewide.

  In addition, The News sponsors two aspiring journalists at Wayne State University with $2,000 grants each year. Last year, 35 Michigan graduates were awarded Rosa Parks scholarships. In applying for the scholarship, applicants must write an essay comparing their lives with Parks'.

  "It gives us an opportunity to find out how students are relating to this woman who put her life on the line," said Sandra Combs Birdiett, the foundation's president.

  The principles Parks stood for have stayed with 25-year-old Karla McKanders of Belleville, who received her scholarship in 1996 and is now a labor attorney in Detroit.

  McKanders has spent much of her life giving back to her community, whether visiting nursing homes in high school, tutoring refugees in college or mentoring college students today.

  "Rosa Parks has served as an example of how I would like to live my life," McKanders said.

 

 

Park's Resolve Shines in Students

By Michael H. Hodges, The Detroit News

June 7, 2004

 

  Curtis Tarrany's dad always tells his son not to give up, and to stay grounded.

  "And I do," says the 17-year-old softly. "Yes I do."

  This fall, Curtis will become the first member of his family to go to college. He's attending Bowling Green State University in Ohio, boosted by a $2,000 scholarship from the Rosa Parks Scholarship Foundation.

  Curtis' father always has been the young man's inspiration. The older man has battled sickle cell anemia his whole life. He's lost almost all of his sight, and periodically suffers bouts of wracking pain. He hasn't been able to work for years, and Curtis' mother has to clean houses to keep body and soul together.

  An olny child, Curtis pitches in whenever he can - doing all of the heavy work around the house and holding down an after-school job to contribute to household finances. On top of that, he still finds time to tutor younger students, play varsity football, and excel in Martin Luther King Jr. High Schools math, science and applied technology program.

  Curtis sees in his father's unrelenting spirit some of the courage that fueled Rosa Parks' nation-shakin decision not to yield her seat on a Montgomery, Ala., bus to a white person when ordered. "She was a fighter," he says. "She risked everything."

  So Curtis goes to college in part for himself, in part for his family - and hopes that a little bit of Rosa Parks' resolve flickers in him, as well.

  Curtis is one of 40 high school graduates from across Michigan to win a Rosa Parks Scholarship. The $2,000 grants are awarded based on achievement, grades, community service and need.

  The Detroit News and the Detroit Public Schools established the Parks Foundation in 1980. More than $1 million has gone to 500-plus scholars.

  Additionally, The News sponsors two students hoping to become journalists.

  For the first time this year, the Butzel Long law firm underwrote a scholarship, and is co-sponsoring - along with The News - a luncheon at The Henry Ford for recipients and their families. The Detroit firm has long contributed administrative and legal services to the enterprise. Follmer Rudzewicz Advisors Inc. donates an annual audit for the foundation, which provides scholarships for students who often have roots from around the world.

  For her part, Parks Scholar Zahra Ajrouche, the daughter of Lebanese immigrants, thinks few people can be compared to the legendary civil rights champion.

  "Rosa Parks didn't let anybody put her down," says the 18-year-old who's graduating from Fordson High School with a 3.9 grade point average.

  "Most people are like, 'Whatever,' " she says. "But she stood up for herself. I find that very admirable."

  Zahra, the youngest of nine children who hopes to become a pharmacist, knows a thing or two about standing your ground.

  For a long time after the September 11 attacks, her extended family - including a number of aunts who wear Islamic veils - was the object of unfriendly stares in restaurants and shops. Zahra wears her heritage proudly, and makes no apologies to anybody.

  "You've just got to hold your head high," she says.

 

 

Award Recipients Show Determination

By Michael H. Hodges, The Detroit News

June 16, 2003

 

            Shipal Ahmen, 18, started interpreting almost the minute he got off the plane from Bangladesh six years ago.

            It took him a little while to get some English under his belt.  But ever since, the Dearborn teen from South Asia has acted as the bridge between his parents and a bewildering America whose culture and language often baffle them.

            Neither of his parents speaks or understands much English.  When his father, a factory machinist, applied for his job, Ahmed called and negotiated with the employer.  When his mother goes to the doctor, the son takes time off from school so he can detail her symptoms to the doctor.

            In addition to juggling those responsibilities, Ahmed racked up a 3.78 grade point average at Detroit?s Northern High School and volunteered at charities, including a shelter for battered women and their children.

            The youthful immigrant is one of 35 high school graduates from across Michigan to win a Rosa Parks Scholarship.  The $2,000 grants are awarded based on grades, community service and financial need.

            Ahmed, who?s going into pre-med at Wayne State University, first learned of Parks? story of courage in the face of institutionalized racism during a history class.

            ?Somebody could have killed her!? he says, marvelling at her bravery on that crowded Montgomery Ala., bus in 1955.

            Ahmed?s convinced he?d do the same thing if put to the test.

            He?s had his own showdowns with racism, he says, especially since 9-11  - after which, he says, many white Americans started looking with suspicion at anyone who looked foreign.

            And perhaps Parks and Ahmed share more than one would guess, inasmuch as Parks herself was an interpreter ? helping, by her example, to translate the everyday humiliations blacks endured into a vocabulary that white America, finally, couldn?t help but start to understand.

            That Parks might have risked far more than jail time comes up time and again in talking with other Rosa Parks Scholarship recipients.

            Some exhibit rather less bravado than Ahmed.

            ?She was willing to risk her life for her beliefs,? says Detroiter Aleesa Searcy.  ?I?m not sure I?m ready for that.?

            Searcy, a Cass Tech grad, enters the University of Michigan this fall, although she?s not sure what she?ll study yet.

            The Detroit News and the Detroit Pubic Schools established the Rosa Parks Foundation in 1980, which has since granted more than 500 scholarships and $1 million to deserving students across the state.

            Additionally, The News sponsors two aspiring journalists at Wayne State with $2,000 grants.

            All in all, says foundation board President Sandra Combs Birdiett, this year more than 300 kids competed for the 35 scholarships.

            ?It is incredibly competitive,? says Combs Birdiett, ?and a lot of work.  But it?s nice ? you?re helping kids pursue higher education.?

            The News and Butzel Long also donate administrative help to the foundation, with the latter providing legal services as well.  Follmer Rudzewicz Advisors Inc. contributes an annual audit.

            For his part, Ahmed will apply the scholarship to his medical studies.

            ?I want to help people, you know?? he says.

            ?And especially my mom.  She?s a diabetic.  So she?s having a very difficult time.  And if I became my own doctor,? he adds, ?I could really help my family.?

 

 

Parks? Spirit Drives Scholar to Succeed

By Tenisha Mercer, The Detroit News

June 17, 2002

 

            What Rosa Parks did on Dec. 1, 1955 on a crowded, racially segregated bus in Montgomery Ala., was told to Jermel Purse dozens of times.

            ?From grade school to high school, that?s all we heard about was Rosa Parks,? said Purse, 18, referring to Parks? refusal to give up her seat to a white man, how it landed her in jail and sparked a bus boycott and the modern civil rights movement.

            Now Purse will have something in common with the civil rights legend.  He is one of 40 graduating high school seniors who will each receive $2,000 grants from the Rosa Parks Scholarship Foundation.

            ?To get a scholarship with her name on it is such an honor,? said Purse, a student at Benjamin O. Davis Aerospace Technical High School, who plans to study electrical engineering at Kettering University in Flint.  ?She overcame so many obstacles.?

            The Rosa Parks Foundation has awarded scholarships and more than $1 million to more than 500 students since it was established in 1980.  Scholarships are awarded to graduating Michigan high school seniors based on financial need, grades, recommendations from counselors and teachers, community involvement, and essays on the life of Rosa Parks.

            ?These are the cream-of-the-crop students we select,? said Sandra Combs Birdiett, incoming president of the Rosa Parks Scholarship Foundation Board of Directors and director of the Journalism Institute for Minorities at Wayne State University.

            Like Parks, Purse knows about diversity.

            He was born blind in one eye.

            But he didn?t let that stop him from becoming a lieutenant colonel core commander in the Air Force Junior ROTC or taking flight training classes at his school.

            Nor did scholarship winner Cynthia London, 19, let the loss of her mother when she was 12 snuff out her dreams.

            The Rosa Parks Scholarship Foundation winner will study marketing at the University of Michigan.  But she also plans to pursue her first love ? acting.  Coincidentally, two years ago, she played Rosa Parks in a student-written play at the Masonic Temple.

            London immersed herself in the role.  She pored over history books, bought an old cotton dress from the thrift store and pinned her hair into a bun to look more like Parks in her 40s.

            Cynthia?s father, Mario London, couldn?t be more proud of his daughter?s accomplishments.

            ?She had a rough time coming up, but I am so proud of her,? said Mario London, who has raised Cynthia and her siblings since their mother?s death.

            The Detroit News helped start the foundation in conjunction with Detroit Public Schools.  In addition to supporting the foundation, The News sponsors two students each year with $2,000 renewable grants to the Journalism Institute for Minorities at Wayne State.

            This year?s awardees are Rhonette Cooper of Denby and Crystal Staffney of Mumford.

            The News and Butzel Long provide administrative services for the foundation.  Butzel Long also donates legal services and the accounting firm PriceWaterhouseCoopers LLC provides an annual audit.

 

 

Winners Reflect Success

By Tenisha Mercer, The Detroit News

June 18, 2001

 

            Countless times growing up, Niyah Carmichael remembers hearing the story of how Rosa Parks refused to give up her seat to a white man on a segregated, Montgomery, Ala., bus in 1955.

            But it wasn?t until she applied for a scholarship in Parks? name that Carmichael truly understood the civil rights pioneer?s legacy.

            ?I just thought she was tired of being disrespected, but it was so much more than that,? said Carmichael, who researched Parks? life when she completed her scholarship essay and application this spring.

            ?I didn?t know she had a history of working with the NAACP.  She made a conscious decision.  It wasn?t about just getting out of her seat.  There were marches, demonstrations.?

            Carmichael is one of 40 graduating Michigan high school seniors who will receive $2,000 college scholarships from the Rosa Parks Scholarship Foundation, a nonprofit foundation established by The Detroit News and Detroit Public Schools in 1980.

            This year?s scholarship winners were selected based on their academic records, financial need, recommendations from counselors and teachers, community involvement and written essays about what makes them a Rosa Parks Scholar.

            A graduating senior at Renaissance High School, Carmichael will study public relations and community service at Alabama State University.

            The News and Butzel Long provide administrative services for the foundation.  Butzel Long also donates legal services and the accounting firm PriceWaterhouseCoopers LLC provides an annual audit.

            The Detroit News also sponsors annual $2,000 tuition scholarships to the Journalism Institute for Minorities at Wayne State University.  This year?s recipients are Mae Yousif-Bashi of Center Line High, and Joleana Wilkins of Detroit Denby.

 

 

42 Named Rosa Parks Scholars

By Lisa Bastien, The Detroit News

June 13, 2000

 

            Fourth-two Michigan graduating high school seniors will walk into the future with scholarships bearing the name of civil rights icon Rosa Parks.

            They are each recipients of $2,000 college grants from the Rosa Parks Scholarship Foundation, an independent non-profit agency established by The Detroit News and Detroit Public Schools 20 years ago to honor the contributions of Parks.

            The students, selected from across the state of Michigan, were chosen from a field of nearly 350 applicants.

            They were evaluated on academic achievement, financial need, recommendations from counselors and teachers, community involvement and writing essays on why they wished to be a Rosa Parks scholar.  The essays addressed the question: ?What makes you a Rosa Parks Scholar??

            ?We consider this much more than just the average scholarship grant because of who it is named for,? said Luther Keith, a Rosa Parks Foundation board member and public editor for The Detroit News.  ?That?s why the community service component is part of the selection process.?

            In 1955, Parks was credited with sparking the modern civil rights movement by refusing to give up her seat on a racially segregated Montgomery, Ala., bus to a white man.

            Her refusal led to the historic Montgomery bus boycott, which was the catalyst for breaking down many racial barriers.

            More than $1 million has been given to more than 500 students since the foundation was established.

            The News and Butzel Long law firm provide administrative services for the foundation.

            Butzel also donates legal services, and Pricewaterhouse Coopers LLP accounting firm provides annual auditing services.

            In addition to the Rosa Parks scholarships, The Detroit News sponsored two more students in the Wayne State University Journalism Institute for Minorities with grants of $2,000 each.  The institute was created in 1985 to promote careers for minorities in the media.

            This year?s students, who will eventually have internships at The News, are Rana Elmir of Dearborn High and Willie Crumpler of Detroit Pershing High.

            Elmir, 17, enjoys drawing, painting and photography.  She volunteers her time with Rouge Rescue every summer to clean the Rouge River.

            ?I?m a very outgoing person,? she said.

            She plans on writing for a newspaper one day.

            ?I?m jumping for joy,? said Elmir.  ?It?s money my father doesn?t have to struggle for.?

            Elmir, who has a 3.7 grade point average, and Crumpler will each receive two years of paid internships with The News in addition to their renewable scholarship grants.

 

 

40 Students Win Parks Scholarships

By Robert Davis, The Detroit News

June 23, 1999

 

            Latoyia Rice, a graduate of Detroit Martin Luther King Jr. Senior High School, has a burning desire to assist people in need.

            Unlike many of her peers, Rice had to cope with the emotional burden of caring for her mother on a daily basis.  Her mother suffers from the debilitating disease of multiple sclerosis.  While assisting in the care of her mother during the school year, Rice was able to maintain a 3.53 grade point average and volunteered at a local nursing home where she assisted in the care of elderly patients.

            Inspired by her mother?s courage, Rice is determined to become a neurologist so that she can continue her outreach of helping those who are in need of care.  ?It meant a great deal to me to receive this scholarship because it will not only afford me the opportunity to pay for books and other expenses I will have, but it will give me an opportunity to carry on her (Parks) legacy.? said Rice, who will use the scholarship to pay her way through Michigan State University in the fall where she will major in clinical neurology.

            Rice?s commitment to help others, her dedication and academic excellence were reasons she was one of the 40 high school graduates from across Michigan who were honored with $2,000 scholarships awarded this year by the Rosa Parks Scholarship Foundation.

            The students, selected based on community involvement, academic achievement and other criteria, were picked by the foundation?s board of directors from a field of nearly 350 candidates.

            In 1980, The Detroit News and Detroit Public Schools teamed up to create the Rosa Parks Scholarship Foundation, a public nonprofit independent corporation.  The award honors civil rights icon Rosa Parks, who in 1955 refused to give up her seat on a racially segregated Alabama bus to a white man.  Her decision is credited with sparking the modern civil rights movement that eventually brought down many racial barriers.

            More than $1 million has been awarded to more than 500 students since the foundation was established.  The scholarship is open to all Michigan high school seniors.

            The News and Butzel Long law form provide administrative services for the foundation.  Butzel also donates legal services, and PricewaterhouseCoopers LLP accounting firm provides annual auditing services.

            In addition to the Rosa Parks scholarships, The Detroit News provides scholarships to two freshmen who will attend Wayne State University?s Journalism Institute for Minorities, a four-year college program to recruit and train minorities for careers in the media.  Those students also will receive two years of paid internships with The News.

            This year?s recipients are Grace Aduroja of Ypsilanti Lincoln High School and Candice Cunningham of Detroit Renaissance High School.

 

 

Rosa Parks grants open to students

The foundation will grant $2,000 to 42 high school seniors this year to pay for first year of college

By Robert Davis, The Detroit News

March 15, 1999

 

Rasheda Williams knows it?s no easy task to get funds for college.

Two years ago, she was faced with the possibility of having to work two jobs to pay for her college education. Determined to attend a university, the Cass Technical High School senior applied for a Rosa Parks scholarship.

?I am thankful for the Rosa Parks Scholarship Foundation," said Williams, now a 19-Year-old Wayne State sophomore in the university's Journalism Institute for Minorities scholar program.

"Applying for the scholarship was the best decision I could have ever made. This was truly an opportunity that I could not pass up."

In 1980, The Detroit News established the foundation to provide Michigan high school seniors with $2,000 grants that are applied to their first year of college.

This year, the foundation will select 42 scholarship recipients on the basis of grade-point average, leadership and dedication to the principles of Rosa Parks and the civil rights movement.

"Applicants have to do research about Rosa Parks' historic perspective because they have to be able to relate her tremendous struggles and achievements to their lives," said Rex Nelson, president of the Rosa Parks Foundation.

"We want to involve and reward those students who are active in their communities, have a good grade point average and exemplify the ability to be a leader in their respective communities and schools.?

Applicants must include three letters of recommendation, a high school transcript, ACT or SAT test scores and an essay of 250 words or less answering the question "What makes you a Rosa Parks Scholar?"

Besides the Rosa Parks scholarships, The News provides scholarships to students who plan to attend Wayne State University's Journalism Institute for Minorities. The students get summer internships at The News too.

Applications must be postmarked by April 1. For applications and more information on the Rosa Parks scholarships, call (313) 222-2538 or (800) 766-3247.

 

 

40 Students Win Parks Scholarships

By Nathan Collins, The Detroit News

June 16, 1998

 

            Chimere Love, a graduate of Detroit Mercy High, has intense passion for acting ? and a driving determination to achieve her life goals.

            She exhibited both traits when she failed to make the cut for a part in one of her school plays.

            Disappointed but not discourages, she learned that auditions were being held for a play at University of Detroit Jesuit High, an all-boys Catholic school.

            She auditioned and won the lead role.

            She showed the same type of determination to become one of 40 recipients of $2,000 scholarships awarded this year by the Rosa Parks Scholarship Foundation.

            The students, selected based on community involvement, academic achievement and other criteria, were picked from a field of nearly 400 candidates across Michigan.

            ?I was honored that I received a scholarship,? Love said.  ?Unlike some scholarships I know what (Parks) believes in and stands for and I feel that in some way I am leading on her legacy.

            Love will use the scholarship to pay her way through Atlanta?s Spelman College in the fall.  She wants to major in computer science and perform in music and theater.

            In 1980, The Detroit News and Detroit Public Schools teamed up to create the Rosa Parks Scholarship Foundation, a public nonprofit independent corporation.  The award honors civil rights icon Rosa Parks, who in 1955 refused to give up her seat on a racially segregated Alabama bus to a white man.  Her decision is credited with sparking the modern civil rights movement that eventually brought down many racial barriers.

            More than $800,000 has been awarded to more than 400 students since the foundation was established.  The scholarship is open to all Michigan high school seniors.

            Tawanna Strauther, a 1989 Rosa Parks Scholar from Cass Technical High School, received a bachelors degree from Tuskegee Institute in 1993 and just graduated from Meharry Medical School in Nashville.

            Strauther urged the latest recipients to ?Utilize the scholarship to the fullest always and remember that the sky?s the limit.?

            Jenice Mitchell, a 1992 recipient from Detroit Martin Luther King High School, used her foundation grant to attend Georgetown University and is now a law student at Northwestern University.

            Mitchell, who will speak at the scholarship luncheon, called Parks ?an amazing individual? because of her outstanding commitment to civil rights.

            The News and Butzel Long law firm provide administrative services for the foundation.  Butzel also donates legal services, and the Price Waterhouse accounting firm provides annual auditing services.

            The foundation board members, comprised of community business leaders, educators and community activists, choose scholars based on academics, a written essay, financial need and community service.

            ?We believe strongly in the things (Rosa Parks) stands for, that everyone is to be treated with dignity and respect,? board member Jarold Adams said.

            In addition to the Rosa Parks scholarships, The News provides scholarships to freshman who plan to attend Wayne State University?s Journalism Institute for Minorities.  Those students also will receive paid internships with The News.

            This year?s recipients are Iyshia Huggins of Cass Tech and Akila Seecharan of Riverside High School in Windsor, a former Cass Tech student.

 

 

Rosa Parks scholar grads are returning favor

By Kortney Stringer, The Detroit News.

February 28, 1998

 

Anthony Curry learned early on that big things come in small packages.

When a small, fragile woman gave him $2,000 for college expenses, the Ann Arbor student realized that she was

giving him more than money - she was passing on her Iegacy.

That woman was Rosa Parks and as a 1991 recipient of the Rosa Parks Scholarship Foundation, Curry learned bo be more active in the community.

 Curry, 24, now is a senior consultant for the Arthur Anderson accounting firm in Washington, D.C.  In his spare time, Curry works with children at a women?s shelter.

?I figured that if a total stranger could give me $2,000 because she believed in me, there were some little things that I could do to help others,? Curry said.  ?My challenges are minuscule compared to what she?s been through.?

The foundation currently is accepting applications for scholarships to be awarded in May.  The Detroit News and Detroit Public Schools created the foundation in 1980 to honor Parks, who refused in 1955 to give up her seat on a Montgomery, Ala., bus to a white man.  Her subsequent aren?t sparked the modern Civil Rights movement.

Every year, the foundation?s board of directors select scholarship recipients based on academic achievement, community involvement and need.  Any Michigan high school senior can apply.

More than 400 people have received more than $800,000 since the program?s inception and like Curry, many credit some of their academic and personal growth to the foundation.

Rene Gates, 26, was a 1989 scholarship recipient.  The Detroiter received a bachelor of arts in journalism at Wayne State University.  Now she works for Campus Crusade for Christ, a nonprofit Christian organization in Chicago that helps students start Christian clubs on college campuses.

?I remember being attracted to it (the scholarship) because the criteria actually applied to me and I thought ?Wow!? because a lot of scholarships eliminated me because of my gps,? Gates, who had a 2.6 grade-point average in high school.

?It meant a lot to me that there were people who were really interested in me and dedicated to helping student.?

 

 

Luncheon to honor ?97 scholarship winners

By Santiago Esparza, The Detroit News

June 18, 1997

 

Erin Lynette Baker figures she is continuing Rosa Parks' fight.

The 18-year-old Southfield resident will attend the University of Michigan this fall where she will major in biomedical engineering. She is one of 43 graduating high school seniors who will receive a $2,000 scholarship through the Rosa L. Parks Foundation. Nearly 400 students from across the state applied.

"I know there are not a lot of women in engineering, but I'm not going to let that bother me," Baker said. "This scholarship will help me live out her dream."

It also will help Baker, a 4.0 student at Southfield-Lathrup High School, erase some of the pain from the racial discrimination her parents felt growing up in Baton Rouge, La.

"My father tells me all the time what he went through growing up ill the South," Baker said. "It's special knowing the scholarship is in Rosa Parks' honor, especially knowing everything she went through and fought for."

Baker played five sports, won numerous scholastic awards and conducted medical research at U-M as part of the university's summer apprenticeship program.

"Sports helped me to keep my grades up and give me structure," she said. "When I don't have anything to do, I get lazy."

The Detroit News and Detroit Public Schools created the scholarship in 1980. The award honors Parks, who in 1955 refused to give up her seat on a racially segregated Alabama bus to a white man. The act is regarded as the spark that ignited the civil rights movement of the 1950s and 1960s.

More than 400 people have received scholarships totaling more than $800,000 since the program began. Winners this year will be honored during an awards luncheon sponsored by Kelly Services.

Detroit Pistons point guard Lindsey Hunter will speak to the scholars. During the past season, Hunter donated $50 to the Rosa Parks Foundation for every three-point basket he made.

In Parks' name, The News also is awarding four-year scholarships and four-year internships to two students at Wayne State University's Journalism Institute for Minorities. a program created to encourage minorities to purse careers in the media. The recipients or those scholarships are Rasheda Williams of Detroit Cass Tech and Phenice Jamerson of Osborn. The News supports the Institute annually with $16,000 and internships for eight students.

The foundation's board of business people, educators and activists pick the scholars based on academics, a written essay, financial need and community service. Requirements include a 3.0 grade-point average.

The News and the Butzel Long law firm provide administrative services for the foundation. Butzel Long also donates legal services, and Price Waterhouse accounting firm provides annual auditing services.

Teresa Ann Ferguson appreciates the support. The 17-year-old Kingston High School student has a 3.9 grade-point average and finished 1996 undefeated in doubles tennis play.

Ferguson. who lives in the Upper Peninsula about 12 hours north or Detroit, will study biology and psychology at St. Norbert College in DePere, Wis. She hopes to become a neuroscientist or cancer researcher.

"My friend had a brain tumor removed last summer so it made me want to go into neuroscience," Ferguson said. "She is OK, the tumor wasn't cancerous, but it made me want to go into the field."

Kevin Jordan, a Cass Technical High School student with a 3.93 grade-point average, has his eyes set on the University of Michigan. He will study chemical engineering there this fall as he works his way to becoming an orthopedic surgeon.

Jordan has scoliosis, a disease that causes a curving of the spine. He said he hopes to help others with the affliction.

"I want people to understand the disease and overcome it," the Detroiter said.  ?I want to help others overcome this."

That is what makes the scholarships important, said Luther Keith, an assistant managing editor at The News and a foundation board member.

"It is not just any other scholarship," Keith said. "We try to select students we think have the ability to make a difference in their communities. The News is honored to participate in this effort that will benefit young people."

 

 

April 1 is deadline for Rosa Parks scholarships

Tuition winners judged on school achievement, community involvement.

By David C. Butty, The Detroit News

March 9, 1997

 

Michigan high school seniors who plan to enroll in college this fall are eligible for $2,000 grants from the Rosa L. Parks Scholarship Foundation. 

April 1 is the application deadline for the one-year scholarships, awarded since 1980 to honor the woman who wouldn't give up her seat to a white man in 1955 on a segregated bus in Montgomery, Ala. Her stand, credited with sparking the modem civil rights movement, drew international acclaim.

Luther Keith, assistant managing editor of The Detroit News and the foundation's first vice-president, said the scholarship is designed to reflect the spirit and ideals of Rosa Parks by opening educational opportunities for deserving students.

"In addition to her place in history as an advocate for civil rights, Mrs. Parks has had a keen interest in seeing that young people receive a good education. " Keith said.

More than 389 students have received Parks grants totaling more than $778,000. Last year, more than 400 students applied and $70,000 was awarded to seniors graduating from public and private schools statewide.

Recipients are picked by a foundation board comprised of Metro Detroit education, business and community leaders.   They are judged on academic achievement and community involvement that emulates the spirit of Rosa Parks.

            Applications may be obtained from high school guidance departments or by sending a self-addressed stamped envelope to: Rosa Parks Scholarship Foundation, Box 950, Detroit, Mich. 48231.

 

 

37 scholarship winner have big dreams, big achievements.

By Melanie S. Mathews, The Detroit News

June 19, 1996

 

Big dreams and encouragement have taken Redford High valedictorian Dana Wathel a long way - and she plans to go further. The 16-year-old Detroiter, who has wanted to become a pediatrician since she was 10, will pursue her career goal this fall at the University of Michigan as a Rosa Parks scholar.

Wathel is one of 35 Michigan graduating high school seniors awarded $2,000 scholarships this year through the Rosa Parks Scholarship Foundation.

Also in Rosa Parks name, The Detroit News awarded four-year scholarships to two students who will be freshmen in the fall at Wayne State University?s Journalism Institute for Minorities. Along with the scholarships, those students will receive four-year internships at The News.

Although she earned an impressive 3.94 grade point average in high school, Wathel said that she expects "college to be harder and I have to study more."

One role model for Wathel is her mother, Nancy, because she encouraged her to be her best. Another is the civil rights pioneer, Rosa Parks, for whom the $2,000 scholarship was named and awarded through the Rosa Parks Scholarship Foundation.

"Rosa Parks is a strong person; she stood up for what she believed," Wathel said. "I try to do the same, but sometimes I'm shy."

Wathel said Rosa Parks scholars should have good deportment, discipline and dedication. "I think that I am a very good example of a Rosa Parks scholar," she wrote in her scholarship essay.

In 1980 The Detroit News and Detroit Public Schools created the scholarship program in honor of Parks. Her refusal to give up her seat to a white man on a racially segregated bus in Montgomery, Ala., in 1955 is credited with sparking the modem civil rights movement, which led to a host of racial barriers falling all across the country.

Since the foundation was formed, 389 scholarships totaling $778,000 have been awarded to high school seniors graduating from public and private schools from across Michigan. This year, $70,000 was awarded.

            There were almost 400 scholarship applicants this year.  Recipients were selected by a panel of education, business and community leaders from Metro Detroit. Each student submitted an essay, an application with their scholastic and leadership accomplishments and letters of recommendation.

The awards committee looked for scholastic achievement, contribution to the community, financial need and how the scholarship candidate would emulate the life of Parks, said Richard Rassel, chairman and chief executive officer of the Butzel Long law firm and out-going chairman of the Rosa Parks Scholarship Foundation.

"Our only regret is that we don't have more money than we do to give out," said Rassel, who will remain on the foundation's board. "We're giving a chance for students to get a college education. It's the most heartwarming thing I do all year."

Rex K. Nelson, director of community relations for the Detroit Pistons and president-elect for the Rosa Parks Scholarship Foundation, said: "Mrs. Parks brings out the best in people. I'm glad to help carry on her legacy."

The 1996 scholars will be honored at an awards luncheon sponsored by The News and Kelly Services.

Janelle Toles of Cass Technical High School plans to use her scholarship at Dartmouth University in Hanover, N.H.   Toles, who ran track and field, and cross country, graduated from high school with a 4.0. She plans to become a corporate lawyer.

"I grew up watching (the civil rights television documentary) Eyes On The Prize on PBS," Toles said. "That is where I first learned about Rosa Parks. I like her strong will."

Future physical therapist Shara Krose graduated from Dundee High School as salutatorian.

"Rosa Parks is very assertive; very self controlled. She knows what's right," said Kruse, who was in the wrestling pep club. "I want to be my own type of person."

The two students who were awarded four-year scholarships and internships by The News are Kortney Stringer of Cass Technical High School and Nathan Collins of Redford High School. Both will start college this fall in WSU's Journalism Institute for Minorities.

"I like to write, express myself and influence lots of people," explained Collins, 17. "Rosa Parks...took a stand that no one else could. She's a role model."

 

 

36 graduates make the grade, do civil rights legend proud

By Tenisha White, The Detroit News

June 8, 1995

 

Raymond Matt Jr. knows that it's no easy task to make a difference.

The 18-year-old student has worked hard to hone his reporting and writing skills, carefully choosing interview questions and then searching for the right words to tell the stories of people in his community.

Matt wants to study journalism and write inspiring stories for a career.

That dream is one step closer after Matt was named one of the winners of the 1995 Rosa L. Parks Scholarships. He is one of 34 high school seniors who will each receive $2,000 scholarships awarded by the Rosa L. Parks Foundation.

"It's an honor," said Matt, a senior at Detroit's Osborn High School. "It makes me feel that all my hard work didn't go to waste.?

            In addition to those scholarships, The News is awarding two four-year tuition scholarships, also in Parks' name, to Wayne State University's Journalism Institute for Minorities. Those scholarships include a four-summer internship at the newspaper.

Matt typifies the commitment of other Rosa Parks scholarship winners who have worked hard toward their career choices. Matt wrote for his high school newspaper, and is a member of the Quill & Scroll Society.

He has won several awards: The Detroit Pistons/Channel 50 Black History Essay; Voice of Democracy Oratorical; and Area E Essay and Elks Oratorical contests.

Matt plans to study journalism at Wayne State University.

He's already won a four-year scholarship from the university's Journalism Institute for Minorities.

"If I can write something positive about one person, hopefully it will inspire other people to do positive things," he said.

The scholarship, created in 1980 by The Detroit News and Detroit Public Schools, honors civil rights pioneer Rosa Parks, who in 1955 refused to give up her bus seat to a white passenger in Alabama. That act of defiance sparked the modem civil rights movement of the 1950s and 1960s.

The Detroit News provides administrative services for the foundation, and the Butzel Long law firm donates legal services. The Price Waterhouse accounting firm provides annual auditing services.

Since its inception, the Rosa L. Parks Foundation has awarded 354 scholarships totaling $708,000 to students from across Michigan.

This year's scholarship winners will be honored June 15 at a ceremony at the Westin Hotel in Detroit.

More than 400 students applied for this year's awards, up from 369 a year ago.

Scholars are chosen by a panel of education, business and community leaders from Metro Detroit, based on academic performance, community service, financial need and a written essay.

The applications often tell the story of students dedicated to excelling, despite often difficult circumstances, said Geraldine Hill, coordinator of Wayne State's Labor Studies Center.

"These kids have gone through a lot of obstacles but still want to maintain and persevere," said Hill, who has been on the board for five years.

"They're hanging in there and have focus in their lives."

Without the scholarships, many of the students' dreams would not be fulfilled.

"So many of our applicants are from single-parent homes," board member Gwendolyn Watley said. "The scholarships are a big financial help for those students."

Beyond helping students reach their goals, Parks' legacy is an inspiration for them. "Winning a scholarship named after Rosa Parks is a real honor," said scholar Waverly Duck, 19, a senior at Osborn High School. A lot of the things people like her did, (allow) me to go to any school I want to."

Scholarship winner Kathryn Schultz of Sterling Heights said Rosa Parks' example shows that personal convictions can make a big difference.

"I'm glad that people like her were willing to stand up," the 18-year-old Sterling Heights High School senior said. "It's amazing that such a little thing could cause such a big reaction."

The scholarship foundation supports a variety of academic pursuits. Patrick Wilson, who earned a 3.82 grade-point average at Birmingham Brother Rice High School, will use his award to study psychology and biology at Howard University in Washington, D.C. He is a member of the National Honor Society, was named a National Achievement Scholar for Negro Students and is included in Who's Who Among American High School Students.

"It's very rewarding," Schultz said.

 

 

Rosa Parks Scholars 1994

By Tom Greenwood, The Detroit News

June 14, 1994

 

Dedication and determination seem to run in Dara Maurant's family.

Maurant, 17, a senior at Detroit's Cass Tech High School, is one of 39 Michigan winners of the 1994 Rosa L. Parks Scholarships - just as her big sister Maisha was in 1991.

"Her efforts motivated me to do my best," said Dara Maurant. "She supports and encourages me in all that I do." The elder sister is majoring in journalism and English at Wayne State University.

Dara Maurant intends to study medicine at the University of Michigan, with help from the one-year, $2,000 scholarship, named for the civil rights pioneer.

"Rosa Parks was a hero in my life," said Maurant, who boasts a 3.86 grade point average. "She was dedicated to us as African-Americans and I hope to follow in her footsteps. It's a great responsibility on my part."

Maurant, the daughter of Gerald and Mary Maurant, is a member of the NAACP Youth Caucus, Alpha Kappa Alpha (AKA) Teens, Cass Pep Club and the National Honor Society. In addition, she always makes time to dance with the Mind, Body and Soul Dance Company.

The Detroit News and the Detroit public schools created the scholarship program in 1980 to honor Rosa Parks, the woman credited with sparking the modem civil rights movement in 1955 when she refused to give up her bus seat to a white passenger in Mobile, Ala.

Winners of this year's Rosa L. Parks Scholarships will be honored June 16 in a ceremony at the Westin Hotel, with Parks expected to attend. To date, the Rosa L. Parks Foundation has awarded 319 scholarships totaling $638,000 to students from all over Michigan.

Scholars are chosen by a panel of education, business and community leaders from Metro Detroit. The selection is based on their academic performance, community service, financial need and a written essay.

In 1994, 369 students applied for the award; 379 scholars applied last year.

Sydney Skinner, a student of the violin for the past 11 years, will use her Rosa Parks scholarship to study music with the goal of becoming a music producer.

"And I want to do a little jazz violin on the side," said Skinner, 18, a senior at Cass Tech High School, whose grade point average is 3.94.

"I'm lucky that I had role models when I was growing up: God, my parents, Rosa Parks and Dr. King," said Skinner, the daughter of Norris and Carolyn Skinner.

"She (Rosa Parks) stood up for us young people and the changes she made are with us today. She's a living example to us all."

As a Rosa Parks scholar, Andre Chenault is adamant about using his good fortune to give something back to his community.

"I plan on helping younger students by creating scholarships like the ones I have received," said Chenault. a senior at Murray Wright High School who has been awarded a total of $12,000 in scholarship money to attend the University of Michigan. He said he plans to major in aerospace engineering.

He credits Rosa Parks as an example that people of all races can follow.

"The way the world is today you have to accept everyone's culture and work together with a common goal," he said. "We can't keep fighting each other."

In addition to the 39 Rosa L. Parks Foundation Scholarships, The News this year is awarding two four-year tuition scholarships - again in Rosa Parks' name - to Wayne State University's Journalism Institute for Minorities. The program also includes a four-summer internship at the newspaper.

One of The News winners is Roshonda Hatley, a senior at Denby High School.

In an essay submitted to the scholarship review board, she said she has gone through many hardships, but never let them get her down. "I am made of pure endurance," said Hatley, who has a 3.5 grade point average.

Hatley, who revels in hard work, is a member of the National Honor Society, an assistant editor at the Denby Log student newspaper and holds a part-time job at a restaurant.

Michael Porter, marketing vice-president for the Stroh Brewery Co., has been on the Rosa L. Parks Scholarship review board for the past three years and has found it extremely satisfying.

"Stroh's has been a major contributor to the foundation and we're quite proud of that," Porter said.

"It's been extremely satisfying to help these young people. They've been such high achievers who have given so much back to the community and will give even more in the future.

"They truly exemplify the high ideals that Mrs. Parks stood for."

The Detroit News provides administrative services for the foundation, and the Butzel Long law firm donates legal services. The Price Waterhouse accounting firm provides annual auditing services.

Richard Rassel, chairman and chief executive officer of Butzel Long, has been working with the foundation since its creation in 1980. He currently is its president-elect.

"We've given many kids a chance they would not have gotten, " he said. "We provide more scholarships than any other organization I know."

News Staff Writer DeADdre Lipscomb contributed to this report.

 

 

Students win scholarships, inspiration from Rosa Parks

-          This year: 44 scholars will receive $2,000 each.

By Elizabeth Atkins, The Detroit News

February 28, 1994

 

When Titonian Wallace agonizes over his engineering homework and exams at the University of Michigan, thoughts of Rosa Parks keep him going.

"She helps drive me to never quit," said Wallace, 18, from Benton Harbor.

The U-M freshman was one of 40 Michigan students who won $2,000 scholarships last year from the Rosa L. Parks Scholarship Foundation.

This year's contest deadline is April 1. Forty-four scholarships will be given, organizers said.

This contest is open to any high school senior in Michigan who has a 2.5 grade-point average, fall 1994 college enrollment, financial need and proven community service. Applicants must also write an essay focusing on the civil rights activism of Rosa Parks, 80.

Parks, a Detroit resident, is credited with sparking the modern civil rights movement in 1955 when she refused to yield her bus seat to a white man in Montgomery, Ala.

So far , the foundation has awarded 280 scholarships totaling $560,000.  In 1980, The Detroit News and Detroit public schools created the scholarships program to honor Parks.

The foundation also provides scholarships to the Journalism Institute for Minorities at Wayne State University and a four-summer internship at The Detroit News.

Another winner, Dana Wolfe, 19, of Detroit, said the $2,000 has enabled her to study harder in her University of Michigan pre-med classes.

Wolfe, a freshman and graduate of Detroit's Cass Technical High School, said without the grant to pay for books and tuition, she'd be forced to get a part-time job.

"It's really a help to me," she said. "The less (work) I have to do, the more I can study."

 

For scholarship applications, contact your high school's guidance department or send a self-addressed, stamped envelope to:  Applications, P .0. Box 950, Detroit, MI 48231. Return completed applications to: Rosa Parks Scholarship Foundation, P .0. Box 950, Detroit, MI 48231.

 

 

Win a day at the theater

The Detroit News, February 14, 1994

 

            The Detroit News is giving away 80 student tickets to a special matinee performance of The Ugly Duck by Detroit?s Youththeatre on Saturday, March 12.

            The play is about city youth who spends the summer with an eccentric aunt in Kansas.  He learns a valuable lesson:  It?s what inside a person?s heart that counts.

            Proceeds from the performance will benefit the Rosa Parks Scholarship Foundation, which awards Michigan high school seniors with a one-year scholarship.

            The Rosa Parks program, which began in 1980, has awarded more than 275 Michigan high school seniors with $2,000 college tuition scholarships.

            Applicants must demonstrate a record of community and civic service, earn a grade point average of 2.5 or above, show financial need, write an essay, and provide three letters of recommendation.

            The Rosa Parks Foundation also selects two students in the Journalism Institute for Minorities Scholarship program at Wayne State University to receive a four-year paid summer internship at The Detroit News.

            Winners for the matinee will be selected in a random drawing.

            Entries should be sent to The Ugly Duck Contest, %The Rosa Parks Scholarship Foundation, P.O. Box 950, Detroit, Mich., 48231.

            Entries must be postmarked by Friday, Feb. 25.

 

 

 

WSU gets $96,000 Rosa Parks? grant for minority journalism scholarships

The Detroit News

October 27, 1993

 

The Wayne State University Journalism Institute for Minorities has received a $96,000 grant from the Rosa Parks Scholarship Foundation. The money will be used to fund eight incoming freshman each year for the next six years, beginning next fall.

Previously, the foundation supported three incoming freshmen a year.

"The institute has a proven track record of success," said Luther Keith, president of the Rosa Parks Scholarship Foundation. "Students who go into the mass communication field can have a great impact on the chances for racial justice in this country."

The institute, established at WSU ten years ago, recruits, trains and finds jobs for talented minority students. Graduates of the institute are now working in newsrooms around the country, including the Wall Street Journal, The Detroit News, the Detroit Free Press, WWJ radio and various television stations.

Ruth Seymour, the institute's director, said she hopes the donation will spur other organizations and corporations to support the institute's goals.

"The Foundation is challenging other organizations to join the effort to improve media images of minorities," she said.

The Rosa Parks Scholarship Foundation was established in 1980 by the Detroit Public Schools and The Detroit News as a tribute to Parks, whose refusal to give up her bus seat to a white passenger in Montgomery, Ala., 35 years ago served as a catalyst for the civil rights movement.

Funds for the scholarships come from corporate endowments and private donations from Detroit News readers.

 

 

Awards: 40 top graduating seniors earn $2,000 college scholarships.

By Eddie B. Allen Jr., The Detroit News

June 9, 1993

 

When Ozalle Gordon recalls her childhood, she often sees images of a drug-addicted mother who abused her. But in her "world of unpleasantness," she still had dreams.

Today, after being chosen as one of 40 graduating Michigan high school students who will receive one-year, $2,000 scholarships to the college of their choice, Gordon is pursuing her dream of becoming a registered nurse.

The Rosa L. Parks Foundation selected the students as its 1993 Rosa Parks Scholars. They will be honored at a ceremony June 16 at the Westin Hotel in which civil rights pioneer Rosa Parks is expected to attend.

"At the time I was going through the things I did as a child, I would wonder, 'Why me?' " Gordon said. "But I think God knew what he was doing because it made me a stronger person."

Gordon, who attends Inkster High School, will begin college at Eastern Michigan University in the fall. She tutors other students.

Like many other Rosa Parks Scholars, she felt determined to succeed, despite the odds against her.

Francoise Reynolds said she knew she was a Rosa Parks Scholar when she began writing a required essay on the topic of what a Rosa Parks Scholar should be.

"When I was writing it, I was putting in different things about a scholar, and I said:  ?Wow, the Lord has blessed me with all these qualities,' " said the future Tennessee State business student.

In her essay, Reynolds used words like "courage" and "devotion."

Reynolds, one of 11 children, said she is devoted to being a role model for her younger brothers and sisters.

"I feel like if I fall, they'll fall right after me . . like dominoes." said Reynolds. third-oldest in her family.

She has been president of her class at Southwestern for three years and is a member of the Prospectors Against Drugs Club. Reynolds also directed Cranbrook's Horizons-Upward Bound Gospel Choir and was honored by The Detroit News as a 1993 Outstanding High School graduate.

She holds two part-time jobs while helping her parents care for her younger siblings, who range in age from 1 to 15.

To date, the Rosa L. Parks Foundation has awarded 280 scholarships totaling $560.000 to students like Reynolds and Gordon. Scholars are chosen by a panel of education, business and community leaders from Metro Detroit based upon academic performance, community service, financial need and a written essay. A record 379 students applied for the award this year; 235 students applied in 1992.

The Detroit News and the Detroit public schools created the scholarship program to honor Parks in 1980. Parks is credited with sparking the modern civil rights movement in 1955 when she refused to give up her bus seat to a white passenger in Montgomery, Ala.

In addition, The Detroit News this year chose one scholar to receive a four-year tuition scholarship to Wayne State University's Journalism Institute for Minorities and a four-summer internship at the paper.

Rosa Parks scholar Carlton Coleman Jr., a senior at Murray-Wright, plans to use his scholarship to study medicine at Wayne State University. He also plans to speak about the honor to other students "who are on the path of total destruction."

"I'll have time to concentrate on my studies and go back to high schools," Coleman said. "I'll talk to students and tell them to stay out of trouble. Maybe they'll receive what I received." Coleman credits faculty members at Murray-Wright for pressuring him to do well in classes.

"The toughest part was dealing with my mom (Darice Coleman), because she works at the school," he said. "Teachers were saying they would tell my mother if I got one question wrong on a test."

Jack Barnds, first vice-president of the National Bank of Detroit and scholarship board member, said: "I'm always impressed with the quality of the kids. It's been borne out by experience that once these kids get in school, the university figures out a way to keep them there."

Rosa Parks scholar Charelia Ridgell, a senior at Detroit Pershing, said: "It makes me feel so proud that I got (the scholarship) on my own. It makes me feel excited to know that people who don't know me trust me to succeed."

Ridgell plans to study child psychology at Michigan State University.

Bill Bomar, a 1989 Rosa Parks Scholar, said it is important for the Parks Foundation to continue sending students to college.  Bomar is a flutist who recently graduated from the Eastman School of Music and will participate in an American-Russian symphony group that will perform in both countries this summer. He will attend graduate school in the fall.

"Schools are very low as far as financial aid," Bomar said. "The scholarship put me in a place where I was able to grow."

This year's Rosa Parks Scholars say they hope to continue their academic and social growth in college.

Said Coleman: "I'm looking forward to seeing other students and seeing what the new challenge is."

The Detroit News provides administrative services for the foundation, and Butzel Long donates legal services. Price Waterhouse accounting firm provides annual auditing services.

 

 

Award program helps educate the young leaders of tomorrow

By Santiago Esparza, The Detroit News

February 15, 1993

 

When Angela Greene received her Rosa Parks scholarship in 1985, she wondered if she could live up to the legend of Rosa Parks.

            Seven years later, Greene is making a name for herself in the field of engineering, and also is giving back to the community by tutoring grade schoolers.

The 25-year-old Detroiter is one of 240 Rosa Parks scholars since 1980.

All high school seniors are eligible.

The $2,000 scholarship award is based on grade-point average, community involvement, an essay, letters of recommendation and financial need.

Luther Keith, president of the Rosa Parks Scholarship Foundation, said the recipients may make history one day.

"The scholarship was created as a testament to the legacy of Rosa Parks and her stand on the bus and to provide opportunities to youngsters with a sense of community involvement and academic achievement who in some small way may make their own stand in history someday,? said  Keith, a Detroit News assistant managing editor.

Greene, who graduated from Cass Tech in 1985 and Howard University in 1990, is an engineer at the Chrysler Tech Center in Auburn Hills, and still belongs to the Alpha Kappa Alpha.

In he spare time she participates in the "World of Work" program, a Chrysler-sponsored project that send employees to grade schools to tutor students.

Greene also is an adviser for a high school girls group that encourages cultural activities and cultural awareness.

She was a member of the same group in high school.

Green said it is important for her to give back to the community.

"That's why I'm tutoring. They (young people) see so many negatives," she said.

"My grandmother passed away the year I got the scholarship, and I wish she would have been around to see it.?

"I know I have a lot to live up to. I think it is prestigious to be a Rosa Parks Scholar,"

Gene Kelley, a Southfield High graduate, knows that feeling of prestige.

The University of Michigan junior received his scholarship in 1990.

"It felt great to get it," said Kelley, 19.

"At first didn't think I was qualified. I remember the feeling....I had opening up the paper and seeing my picture in it. It was pretty good."

Renee Gates, a graduate of Royal Oak Shrine High School and a junior at Wayne State University, said she was grateful to be named a Rosa .Parks Scholar in 1990.

"I was honored to receive an award that honors Rosa Parks," said Gates, a journalism major.

"The civil rights movement would have taken longer without her boldness."

Gates said the scholarship has bolstered her self-confidence.

"I knew what I wanted to pursue, but didn't know if I would succeed at it," said Gates, who wants to be a copy editor.

"Now I know I can succeed at it."

 

.Santiago Esparza is a Metro Detroit freelance writer and a Rosa Parks scholar.

 

How to apply for scholarship:

Michigan high school seniors Interested in applying for a Rosa Parks scholarship can obtain an application by:

Contacting: A school counselor.

Writing: Send a self-addressed, stamped envelope to Rosa Parks Applications. P.O. Box 950. Detroit. Mich., 48231.

Other things to keep in mind:

Deadline: Applications must be postmarked by April 15.

Rules: The non-renewable $2,000 scholarships must be applied to the student's first year at any accredited college or university in the United States.

 

 

Rosa Parks Leads New Crusade: Helping Kids Through Education

By Valarie Basheda,  The Detroit News

February 7, 1993

 

            At 80 years old, Rosa Parks is still battling.

            The woman who?s known as the mother of the modern civil rights movement says educating youth is the new battlefront.

            ?The young people are our future, and we must be more concerned about giving them inspiration and training and motivation,? Parks said in a telephone interview from her home in Los Angeles, where she spends the winter months.

            ?It?s not the same as it was in my early life, but there are still problems to be faced,? said Parks, whose refusal to give up her seat on a bus in 1955 sparked the famous Montgomery bus boycott and touched off an era of civil rights protests.  ?They need to be guided to have the type of character to evade some of the conditions that are prevalent today.?

            Parks, who has lived in Detroit since 1957, said her impoverished upbringing in rural Alabama taught her the value of hard work, discipline and respect for authority.

            By age 6, she was handed a flour sack and told to pick cotton on her grandfather?s 18-acre farm, which had been part of a plantation.  She could only attend school from late fall to early spring, when her hands weren?t needed in the field.

            She and other children who walked to school were sometimes taunted by white students who threw trash at them out the window of their bus.

            At that time, Parks said blacks had no recourse but to step out of the way.

            But as she grew up and later attended school in Montgomery, Parks said she grew weary of being told where she could not drink, could not sit, or could not go to the bathroom.

            That frustration hit its peak on an evening in 1955, when a white man asked her to surrender her seat on a Montgomery bus.

            But Parks said that her defiant refusal, which sparked the movement that ended the oppressive practices she loathed, was undertaken with respect and authority.

            ?I actually did not show disrespect because I did not have any argument, or disorderly conduct, and I did not resist arrest,? she said.

            That?s one reason she denounces violence and tells young people today that they must protest discrimination within the boundary of the law.

            ?It is better for them to have behavior that is above reproach and face whatever it is in a way that they can be respected for their actions,? Parks said.

            Parks espouses that philosophy ? along with an emphasis on spirituality and respect for personal health ? through her work with the Rosa and Raymond Parks Institute for Self-Development.  Raymond parks, Rosa?s husband of 45 years, died in 1977.

            Founded in 1987, the institute launched its first adopt-a-school program with Detroit?s Guest Middle School Thursday in honor of Parks? 80th birthday.

            Volunteer mentors from the business, technical and professional communities will work with up to 50 students in the after-school program, teaching them about human relations, personal growth, goal setting, communication skills, and health awareness.

            ?The institute is adopting the school so we can help youth reach their highest potential,? said Elaine Steele, Parks? personal representative and co-founder of the institute.

            While Parks said she is sometimes discourages about the lack of motivation, spirituality and knowledge of history among today?s youth, she blames adults for not passing those values on to their children.

            ?It?s the fault of the adults and the parents and relations, of those who have not put forth their efforts to reach them, how they may be able to grow up to think more of others and to be concerned about freedom and equality,? she said.

            The institute also aims to educate young people about civil rights history through Pathways to Freedom tours, which take students on historical stops along the Underground Railroad.

            Helping youth is also the focus of the Rosa Parks Scholarship Foundation.  Founded by the Detroit News and the Detroit Public Schools in 1980, it has awarded Michigan high school seniors 240 college scholarships totaling $480,000.

            Park?s work has touched people in other nations.

            The former seamstress was recently honored by a woman?s branch of Japan?s Soka University, which has a satellite campus in the Los Angeles area.  University spokeswoman Jeff Ourvan said Japanese women, now embroiled in their own fight for equality, were moved by Parks? appearance at a recent human rights lecture series.

            ?The young women were really encouraged by her struggle, and she encouraged them with what they had to do with their own civil rights struggle,? Ourvan said.  ?It really touched them.?

            Parks might also work with the university on a program to correct negative stereotypes some Japanese hold about African Americans, Ourvan said:

            ?She did it in America, maybe she can do it in Japan, too.?

            Despite the limitations of Parks? age and health, she maintains an active speaking schedule in addition to her duties at the Foundation and Institute.  About 50 appearances are scheduled for this year, including a trip to Africa with former U.S. Secretary of Health Dr. Louis Sullivan.

            And everywhere she goes, audiences ask her to retell the story of her courageous act almost 40 years ago.

            Although Parks wants her tale to inspire others, she also hopes to be remembered for more than her defiant stand.

            ?I feel that people should not think in terms of only the bus incident in my life, but that I always tried and wanted to be concerned with the problems of the people and trying to help them as much as I possibly could,? Parks said.  ?Especially young people and teaching them how to conduct themselves in times of crisis.?

 

 

Head of the class:  Students receive one-year $2,000 scholarship to college of their choice.

By Tricia Serju, The Detroit News

June 16, 1992

 

They dream of becoming doctors, engineers, and journalists. One wants to be mayor of Detroit while another aspires to be the first female African American U.S. Supreme Court justice.

Although they may come from different backgrounds, 48 Metro Detroit high school graduates were named 1992 Rosa Parks Scholars and each will receive a one-year $2,000 scholarship to the university of their choice from the Rosa L. Parks Scholarship Foundation.

I'm from China, and many scholarship programs here say you must be a U.S. citizen," said 18-.year-old Linglan Xu. "When I received the award letter, I just cried. Now my dream of becoming a computer science teacher will come true."

The winners and their families will attend an award luncheon on June 18, during which Rosa Parks will address the scholars.

?I felt very honored because I was one of the chosen few,? said 17-year-old Tenisha White.  ?I was so surprised because I read about the past recipients and they were outstanding.

The Detroit News and the Detroit public schools created the scholarship program to honor Parks in 1980.  Parks is credited with sparking the modern civil rights movement in 1955 when she refused to give up her bus seat to a white passenger in Montgomery, Ala.

A Rosa Parks Scholar must demonstrate leadership ability, community involvement and stand against racial prejudice.  Student must write an essay on what a Rosa Parks Scholar should be.

The winners are chosen by the foundation board.  Its members include education, business and community leaders from Metro Detroit.

?We had a large pool of youngsters that were exceptionally qualified,? said board assistant secretary Geraldine Hill.  ?it was hard to make a decision.  If I could, I would have given at least half of them a scholarship, but it?s impossible.?

Two scholars, Nicole Jihad and White, were chosen by The Detroit News to receive a four-year tuition scholarship to Wayne State University?s Journalism Institute for Minorities and a four-summer internship at the paper.

To date, the foundation has awarded 240 scholarships totaling $480,000.

The Detroit News provides administrative services for the foundation while legal services are donated by the firm of Butzel Long.  Annual auditing services are provided by Price Waterhouse accounting firm.

 

 

Scholars symbolize Rosa Parks? struggle

By Tricia Serju, The Detroit News

February 10, 1992

 

Moving from the peace and quiet of Muskegon to the fast-paced bustle of Detroit was a culture shock for 18-year-old Tressa Crosby. The 1991 Rosa Parks Scholar had only been to the city once before for a brief visit.

?I thought I would have to dodge bullets and see drug transactions on every street corner, ? said the Wayne State University freshman.  ?Now I know it's nothing like that. Coming here as a Rosa Parks Scholar helped push aside stereotypes that people from small cities have about Detroit."

Crosby is one of about 192 former Michigan high school seniors who were chosen by the Rosa Parks Scholarship Foundation since 1980 to receive a one-year, $2,000 college tuition scholarship.

"I was all set to go to Central Michigan University, but when I received the scholarship I decided to attend WSU," she said. "My parents were paying off (college) loans on my older brother. This made it easier on them."

Luther Keith, foundation president and business editor for The Detroit News, said the foundation was created to recognize students who symbolized what Parks stands for.

"We want to give this to students who will improve society like Rosa Parks changed this nation with her stand on the bus," he said.

            ?These are students who have shown there are some things more important than just going to school."

Applicants for the scholarship must demonstrate a record of community and civic service, earn a grade point average of 2.5 or above, demonstrate financial need, write an essay and furnish three recommendations.

The number of scholarships awarded is based on the amount of money raised from private donations from Detroit News readers, the Detroit Board of Education, and school activities such as bake sales and car washes.

A student does not have to attend a Michigan university or be a minority to receive an award.

"I didn't expect college to be so hard,? said 18-year-old WSU freshman Eulika Robinson. ?The classes expect more out of you, and your attendance is more important now than in high school."

A pharmacy major, Robinson said she was proud to be named a scholar last year. Despite the sacrifices made by Parks and others for civil rights, she said her generation doesn't really relate to what happened then.

"Young people take for granted that they can ride the bus," she said. "They don't realize the trouble (Parks) went through. A Rosa Parks Scholar is willing to work hard and won't let anything stop them from doing that."

Without the scholarship award, Kristie Danielle Gardner would not have been able to attend WSU last year .

"I thought I wouldn't be able to go because I didn't have the money," said the management information systems major.  ?The scholarship took the pressure off."

In addition to the scholars, two will be honored by The News with four-year scholarships of $2,000 per year to WSU?s Journalism Institute for Minorities.

The program recruits, trains and finds jobs for talented minority students. The two selected also will spend four summers as Detroit News interns.

"The foundation trustees believe that an important way to improve society is to produce a more responsive and responsible media," said Ruth A. Seymour, a board member and director of the institute.

Michigan high school seniors can obtain a scholarship application from their guidance counselors, or by sending a stamped self-addressed envelope to the Rosa Parks Scholarship Foundation, P.0. Box 950, Detroit, Mich., 48231. Contributions can be sent to the same address. The deadline for applications is April 15.

Tricia Serju is a Metro Detroit free-Iance writer and a 1989 Rosa Parks Scholar.

 

 

Making a difference:  Teens with a vision get a boost to help fulfil their dreams

By Latitia McCree , The Detroit News

June 13, 1991

 

Anthony Curry knows being a teen-ager today isn't easy. The 17-year-old Ann Arbor resident says the lack of role models and the lure of drugs complicate life for teens. He wants to change that.

One day, Curry wants to open a youth community center to provide poor kids with a place that would keep them out of trouble.

"I was hoping to be a role model for black male youth," Curry said. " As for me growing up, I didn't see positive black male youth in the media or anywhere."

Curry and 56 other Michigan high school seniors have been awarded a one-year, $2,000 scholarship by the Rosa L. Parks Scholarship Foundation.

"The recipients really reflect what Parks symbolizes, which is a commitment to the world around you," said Luther Keith, foundation president.

The scholarship program was created by The Detroit News and the Detroit public schools in 1980 to honor Parks, who sparked the modem civil rights movement in 1955 by refusing to give up her bus seat to a white passenger in Montgomery, Ala.

Rosa Parks Scholars must demonstrate leadership ability, community involvement and stand against racial prejudice.

Students are required to write an essay on what a Rosa Parks Scholar should be.

In addition to the 57, two other Rosa Parks Scholars are picked by The Detroit News to receive a four-year scholarship to Wayne State University Journalism Institute for Minorities.

Denise Ward, a Cass Technical High School senior and a 1991 Rosa Parks Scholar, wants to open her own dance school and company.

"I love to dance. I just want to give future generations what I've been given," said Ward, who plans to major in dance at Wayne State University.

Another recipient, Marcus Washington of the University of Detroit Jesuit High School, wants to study medicine.

"I plan to open my own personal practice to help people in Detroit," he said.

To date, the foundation has awarded 192 scholarships totaling $384,000. Rosa Parks will address the scholars at a luncheon that will be held June 18 in their honor.

The winners are chosen by the foundation board. The board includes education, business and community leaders from Metro Detroit.

Legal services for the foundation are donated by the firm of Butzel Long. Annual auditing services are provided by Price Waterhouse accounting firm.

 

 

Deadline nears for Rosa Parks Scholarships

By Kimberly Trent, The Detroit News

April 1, 1991

 

q       For Students:   Applications must be in by April 15 for the 1-year, $2,000 grants.  High school   seniors in Michigan are eligible.

 

            Michigan high school seniors can still apply for grants from the Rosa L. Parks Scholarship Foundation.  The application deadline is April 15.

            Established by Detroit public schools and The Detroit News as a tribute to Rosa Parks? historic stand against segregation, the foundation has awarded 149 scholarships in 11 years.

            We are always astonished by the quality of applicants,? said Rosa Parks Foundation President Luther Keith, who also is business editor of The Detroit News.  ?Last year, we had nearly 200 applications.?

            The one-year, $2,000 scholarships are open to all Michigan graduating high school seniors who plan to attend any private or public university in the fall.  The scholarship program has grown from one scholarship in 1980 to 43 scholarships in 1990.

            In addition, two students will be chosen as Detroit News-Rosa Parks Scholars.  They will receive special four-year scholarships to the Journalism Institute for Minorities at Wayne State University.

            Scholarship applicants must have a minimum 2.5 overall grade point average and demonstrate financial need.

            The foundation also closely examines an applicant?s commitment to community service.

            ?The Rosa Parks scholarship, foundation members believe, is more than just another scholarship,? Keith said.  ?Because of the person it is named for, we try to select students who are committed to having an impact on their communities ? much as Rosa Parks did on the world.?

            Parks refused to give up her seat in the whites-only section of a Montgomery, Ala., bus in 1955 touching off a historic bus boycott that was a catalyst for the modern civil rights movement.

            Today, Parks is an international symbol of dignity, racial pride and courage.  At 78, Parks, who lives in Detroit, still maintains an active community service calendar.

            ?We now have Rosa Parks scholars who have finished college and are making contributions as doctors, journalists and in other professions,? he said.  ?Many of our young people are talented and committed to making the world a better place.  It?s very gratifying to use the foundation to help them.?

            Applications for the scholarship can be obtained from Michigan high school guidance departments or by sending a self-addressed, stamped envelope to:  Rosa Parks Scholarship Applications, P.O. Box 950, Detroit, Mich., 48231

 

 

 

43 high school seniors win college scholarships

By Kimberly Trent, Detroit News Staff Writer

June 11, 1990

 

Forty-three Michigan high school seniors have been awarded one-year, $2,000 college scholarships by the Rosa L. Parks Scholarship Foundation.

In addition, two students have received four-year scholarships to the Wayne State University Journalism Institute for Minorities from The Detroit News.

The foundation was established in 1980 by the Detroit Public Schools and The News as a tribute to Parks, whose refusal to give up her bus seat to a white passenger in Montgomery, Ala. 35 years ago served as a catalyst for the civil rights movement.

Since 1980, the foundation has awarded 149 college scholarships totaling $298,000 to graduating high school seniors based on academic achievement, school and community involvement and financial need. Applicants also are judged on three letters of recommendation and an essay.

PARKS, 77, has been lauded for her commitment to public service. A Detroit resident for more than two decades, she has participated in community service activities and spoken to groups across the nation. The scholarship's foundation board members say an applicant's public service record is an important factor in the selection process.

"Our scholarship is unique because we try to train community leaders while they're young," said Ruth Seymour, a foundation board member and director of the Wayne State University Journalism Institute for Minorities.

Dr. Cassandra Tribble, 27, received the Rosa Parks scholarship in 1981. A June graduate from the University of Michigan's medical school, Tribble said the scholarship inspired her to continue her education.

"The scholarship worked as a catalyst for me to find other monies."

Tribblo said. "It was quite significant.?

Tribble continued a strong high school record of academic excellence and community involvement during her college years. She graduated cum laude from Howard University.  While in medical school, she served as president of the Black Medical Association. She was also a founder and national president of the student component of the National Medical Association. She said knowing she'd won a scholarship inspired by Rosa Parks encouraged her to make time for community service.

"I served in leadership roles throughout college," Tribble said, "It wasn't easy. I was able to benefit from Mrs. Parks' struggle. She's a real role model."

PARKS PLANS to attend a luncheon in honor of the scholarship winners this week.

The scholarship foundation's board reviews the applications and selects the winners. The board includes education, business and community leaders from Metro Detroit.

Funds for the scholarships come from corporate endowments and private donations from Detroit News readers. Legal services for the foundation are donated by Butzel, Long, Gust, Klein and Van Zile. The Price Waterhouse accounting firm donated its services. The Detroit News furnishes administrative services to the foundation and sponsors the annual awards luncheon.

Two students - Eddie Allen Jr.. and Marcus Franklin - have been honored by The News. Each has received four-year scholarships of $2,000 a year to the Wayne State University Journalism Institute for Minorities. The institute recruits, trains and finds jobs for talented minority students. Allen and Franklin will be offered summer internships at The News for four years.

They were chosen by institute director Ruth Seymour for their academic achievement and potential success in journalism.

 

 

54 high school seniors win one-year college scholarships

By Kimberly Trent, News Special Writer

June 20, 1989

 

Fifty-four Michigan high school seniors have been awarded one-year, $2,000 college scholarships by the Rosa L. Parks Scholarship Foundation.

In addition, two other high school seniors have received four-year scholarships to Wayne State University's Journalism lnstitute for Minorities from The Detroit News.

The foundation was established in 1980 by the Detroit Public Schools and The News as a tribute to Rosa Parks, whose refusal to give up her bus seat to a white passenger in Montgomery, Ala. In 1955 served as a catalyst for the civil rights movement.

A luncheon will be held in honor of these students. Parks, a 76-year- old Detroit resident, plans to attend.

In the past nine years, the foundation has awarded 106 college scholarships totaling $212,000 to high school graduates based on academic achievement, school and community involvement, and financial need. Applicants must submit three letters of recommendation and write an essay about what they think a Rosa Parks scholar should be.

The foundation board reviews the applications and selects the scholars. The board includes education, business and community leaders from Metro Detroit.

Funds for the scholarships come from corporate endowments, private donations from News readers and the Detroit Public Schools. This year the Detroit school system raised more than $14,000 for scholarships with bake sales, spaghetti dinners, contribution canisters and candy sales.

In addition, Bob Lesnau of Lesnau Printing donated application forms and the law firm of Butzel, Long, Gust, Klein and Van Zile donated legal serves.

Two students. Latitia McCree and Tricia Serju. have been honored by The News. Each received four-year scholarships at $2,000 per year to WSU's Journalism Institute for Minorities, which recruits, trains and finds jobs for talented minority students. They also will be given summer internships at The News.

These students were chosen by Ruth Seymour, the institute's director, for their academic achievement and potential for success in journalism.

 

 

Scholarships: Dreams to Reality

Rosa Parks foundation needs your help to aid others

By Alicia Cooper, The Detroit News

March 30, 1989

 

Rosa Parks is the driving force behind an important college scholarship program for Michigan students.  But there is some irony in that.

            She never attended college.

            It was not from lack of interest, said the 76-year-old mother of the modern civil rights movement.  It was because circumstances did not permit it.

            That?s why, Parks said, she respects high school students who pursue a college education, and why she supports organizations like the Rosa Parks Scholarship Foundation.

            The scholarships were established nine years ago to further the efforts of Parks, who sparked the modern civil rights movement in 1955 when she refused to relinquish her seat on a bus to a white man in Montgomery, Ala., in defiance of the city?s segregation ordinances.

            Higher education was important in the 1950s, said Parks, who now lives in Detroit ? but it?s even more important today because of limited job opportunities.

            ?We need all the education we can get to compete in today?s society,? Parks said.  ?It?s difficult to find good jobs without higher education.  Without proper education there will be more poverty.?

            A one-year, nonrenewable Parks scholarship is available to any Michigan high school graduate who demonstrates good grades and community service.  Last year, 22 students received scholarships of  $2,000 apiece.

            Although the scholarships will not pay for four years in college, Parks said they will give a student financial support during the important first year, which often is the difference whether or not a student goes on to complete college.

            She said the students who receive the scholarships are the kind who not only maintain good grade-point averages but also get involved in extracurricular and community activities.

            ?Just going to school and doing no more than the academics required isn?t a fulfilled life for a young person,? she said.

            Parks said she has met and kept in touch with many scholarship recipients who are doing just that ? fulfilling their dreams.  And she offers them this advice:

            ?The recipients, as they go into their chosen careers, should keep in mind that there are others less fortunate than they were.?

            Parks said the latest recipients should also try to inspire future scholarship winners to do their best.

            But for students to achieve their goals they need public support, said Parks.

            ?The more donations received for education means a better opportunity for those who need it,? she said.

            As an added incentive foe those who donate to the Rosa Parks Scholarship Foundation, there will be a drawing to receive a free lunch with two Detroit News columnists ? either George Cantor, Betty De Ramus, Nickie McWhirter or Laura Berman.  Donations must be postmarked by April 15 to be eligible for the drawing.

            Michigan high school seniors can obtain Parks Scholarship applications through high school guidance departments or by sending a self-addressed, stamped envelope to the Rosa Parks Scholarship Foundation, P.O. Box 950, Detroit 48231.  Contributions can be sent to the same address.

            The deadline for applications is April 30.

 

 

 

Rosa Parks Foundation Goal: More Donations

By Alesia Cooper, The Detroit News

March 13, 1989

 

            The civil rights movement may call for new perspectives in the 1990s but the Rosa L. Parks Scholarship Foundation plans to keep on doing what it does best: giving young people an opportunity to go to college.

            ?Our primary mission will remain funding educational programs for qualified first-year college students,? said R. Sue Smith, president of the scholarship foundation.

            It is a mission that has made a difference for a number of Metro Detroit youngsters.  Since its inception in 1980, the Rosa Parks Scholarship Foundation has awarded 52 scholarships totaling $104,000.

            The scholarship was established to further the efforts of Rosa Parks who sparked the modern civil rights movement in 1055 when she refused to relinquish her seat on a bus to a white man in Montgomery, Ala., in defiance if the city?s segregation ordinances.

            The scholarship is available to any Michigan high school graduate who demonstrates good grades and community service.

            Although the foundation isn?t going to make any major changes in the way the scholarship program is run, it does plan a more aggressive program to ensure its long-term survival.

            The foundation?s 18-member board consists of representatives from the school system, major Detroit businesses, newspapers, accounting firms, legal firms, banks, community organizations and the private sector, said Smith, a board member for two years.

            To make sure the program is financially healthy well into the next decade, Smith said the foundation will continue to identify organizations interested in donating to the scholarship program.  The foundation is reaching out to other organizations that share its educational convictions, she said.

            In addition, Smith said the foundation is establishing a group of past scholarship recipients who represent the nonprofit organization in the community and serve as a peer-support group for future recipients.

            And the foundation is developing a Rosa Parks coloring book that would raise money for the program and increase awareness of the foundation?s commitment to community involvement and heighten recognition of Rosa parks and the civil rights movement through its illustrations, Smith said.

            By donating to the scholarship program, individuals become eligible for a drawing to receive a free lunch for two with one of these Detroit News columnists: George Cantor, Betty DeRamus, Nickie McWhiter or Laura Berman.  Donations must be postmarked by March 31 to be eligible for the drawing.

            Michigan high school seniors can obtain applications for the Rosa Parks Scholarship Foundation through guidance departments or by sending a self-addressed, stamped envelope to the Rosa Parks Scholarship Foundation, P.O. Box 950, Detroit, MI, 48231.

 

 

 

Teen Wins Ivy League Spot

By Alesia Cooper, The Detroit News

March 1, 1989

 

            Therisa Rogers always wanted to attend an exclusive east coast college, but didn?t want to burden her parents with the high cost of an Ivy League education.

            That burden was partially lifted from her parents? shoulders when Rogers was awarded the Rosa Parks Scholarship, a one-year, nonrenewable equal-opportunity grant offered to Michigan high school students who demonstrate good grades, financial need and community service.

            With the $2,000 Rosa Parks Scholarship, a grant from the University of Pennsylvania and a part-time job she was able to pay for her freshman year at the Ivy League school.

            Not having to search for money her first year, Rogers spent much of that time studying for a difficult freshman Arabic course.  She was the only student in her class to complete the course.

            Because of her high marks in freshman Arabic, her professor recommended her for a Rotary International Scholarship to the American University of Cairo.  Rogers won the scholarship and will spend a year, beginning this July, in the Middle East.  While at the university, her goal is to meet Egyptians, learn their culture, and leave a little of America behind, she said.

            Rogers, 19, is currently a sophomore at the University of Pennsylvania in Philadelphia, and majors in Islamic Near East.  In addition, she takes classes in the masters and doctorate programs, and plans to seek a law degree, possibly in international tax law.

            Rogers won the Rosa L. Parks Scholarship in 1987, the year she graduated from Renaissance High School in Detroit.  She said the best part about the scholarship was that it bares the name of a prominent civil rights leader who could be considered the initiator of the civil rights movement.

            The Parks scholarship was established in 1980 to further the efforts of Rosa Parks, who sparked the modern civil rights movement when in 1955 she refused to relinquish her seat on a bus to a while man in Montgomery, Ala., in defiance of the city?s segregation ordinances.

            The scholarship money comes from the Rosa L. Parks Foundation, the Detroit Public Schools, fund-raising by student and donations from The Detroit News and the newspaper?s readers.

            All Michigan high school seniors are eligible.  To apply, applicants must graduate from high school by August, have a grade-point average of 2.5 or better, show financial need and participate in civic and community service.

            They must also be able to confirm admission to a university or college before August, be available for fall 1989 enrollment, provide three letters of recommendation from school representatives, clergy or community leaders and furnish official copies of their high school transcript and American College Testing or Scholastic Aptitude results.

            In addition, applicants must write an essay about Parks and the attributes that recipients of the scholarship would posses.

            Applications are available through high school guidance departments or by sending a self addressed, stamped envelope to the Rosa L. Parks Scholarship Foundation, P.O. Box 950, Detroit 48231.  Contributions also can be sent to the same address.  The deadline for applications is April 30.

           

 

Small Donations Add up to Big Dollars for Fund

By Alesia Cooper, The Detroit News

February 20, 1989

 

            Big corporations aren?t the only ones that give money for good causes.  In Detroit, kindergarteners do, too.

            From the youngest students to school custodians to principals ? people at all levels of the Detroit public schools are contributing to the Rosa L. Parks Scholarship Foundation fundraising drive.

            Last year, more than $15,000 ? a record ? was raised in the schools for the scholarship program, said Marie Furcron, coordinator for fund-raising activities in the school district and secretary of the Parks foundation.

            The equal-opportunity scholarships pay for the first year of college for Michigan high school graduates who demonstrate good grades and community service.

            The foundation is also supported by donations from The Detroit News and the newspaper?s readers.

            Furcron said the largest gift from a single school group last year, not counting donations from entire schools, was $100 from the custodians union.

            But enough of these small donations ?add up to big dollars,? Furcron said.

            Besides donations from individual students, money comes from students staging activities such as dances, shows and bake sales.

            Furcron believes one reason students are becoming more involved in supporting the Parks scholarship program is because Rosa Parks lives in Detroit.

            The scholarships were established in 1980 to further the civil rights efforts of Parks, who made history in 1955 when she refused to give up her seat on a bus to a white man in Montgomery, Ala., in defiance of the city?s segregation ordinances.

            ?I think they?re aware of her as a historical figure,? Furcron said.  ?She appears in newspapers, and they can identify with her.?

            Since its inception, the foundation has awarded 52 scholarships totaling $104,000.

            To apply this year, applicants must graduate from high school by August, have a grade-point average of 2.5 or better and show financial need and participation in civic and community service.

            They must also be able to confirm admission to a university or college before August, be available for fall 1989 enrollment, provide three letters of recommendation from school representatives, clergy or community leaders and furnish official copies of their high school transcript and American College Testing or Scholastic Aptitude results.

            In addition, applicants must write an essay about Parks and the attributes that recipients of the scholarship would posses.

            Applications are available through high school guidance departments or by sending a self addressed, stamped envelope to the Rosa L. Parks Scholarship Foundation, P.O. Box 950, Detroit 48231.  Contributions also can be sent to the same address.  The deadline for applications is April 30.

 

 

 

Grant Became Stepping Stone

By Alesia Cooper, The Detroit News

February 13, 1989

 

            When Christopher Carswell II received a $2,500 Rosa Parks Scholarship in 1982, he was a happy man.  Little did he realize how it would change his life.

            The Parks scholarship kicked off a series of events that led 23-year-old to a promising engineering career with the Ford Motor Co., where he is now a program planning analyst in the truck operations division in Dearborn.

            The scholarship ?was basically my stepping stone,? he said.

            Carswell, of Detroit, had just begun his freshman year at the University of Michigan in Ann Arbor when he was awarded the scholarship.  Derrick Scott, a director of the Minority Engineering Program Office at U. of M., read about Carswell, whom he had never met, for a Ford internship program.

            ?I was able to pay the rest of my way through school,? Carswell said.

            The Parks scholarship is a one-year nonrenewable equal-opportunity grant offered to Michigan high school seniors who demonstrate good grades and community service.

            It was established in 1980 to further the civil rights efforts of Parks, who made history in 1955 when she refused to give up her seat on a bus to a white man in Montgomery, Ala., in defiance of the city?s segregation ordinances.  Parks now lives in Detroit.

            The scholarship money comes from the Rosa L. Parks Scholarship Foundation, the Detroit Public Schools, fund-raising projects by students and donations from The Detroit News and the newspapers? readers.

            Before U. of M., Carswell went to Cass Technical High School in Detroit, where he was a member of the Junior Engineering Technical Society and the National Honors Society.

            Although he was active in extra-curricular activities, Carswell said he wasn?t very outgoing.  But the scholarship ?gave me an extra incentive to succeed.?  From then on ?I was unwilling to fail.?

            In August 1987, Carswell graduated from U. of M. with a bachelor of science degree in mechanical engineering.  Of about 1,000 graduates, only three were black, he recalled.

            A month later he was offered a permanent job at Ford.

            In recent years, to increase the number of scholarships, Rosa Parks awardees have received $2,000 scholarships.  Since its inception, the foundation has awarded 52 scholarships totaling $104,000.

To apply this year, applicants must graduate from high school by August 1989, have a grade-point average of 2.5 or better and show financial need and participation in civic and community service.

            They must also be able to confirm admission to a university or college before August, be available for fall 1989 enrollment, provide three letters of recommendation from school representatives, clergy or community leaders and furnish official copies of their high school transcript and American College Testing or Scholastic Aptitude results.

            In addition, applicants must write an essay about Parks and the attributes that recipients of the scholarship should posses.

            Applications are available through high school guidance departments or by sending a self addressed, stamped envelope to the Rosa L. Parks Scholarship Foundation, P.O. Box 950, Detroit 48231.  Contributions also can be sent to the same address.  The deadline for applications is April 30.

 

 

4 named Rosa Parks Foundation trustees

Group supervises scholarship fund

The Detroit News, July 10, 1988

 

            Four new trustees have been named to the Rosa L. Parks Scholarship Foundation.

            Joining trustees Rosa L. Parks and Detroit Schools Supt. Arthur Jefferson on the board are Jarold Adams, Benjamin Burns, Richard Rassel, and George Warden.

            On Dec 1, 1955, Mrs. Parks was arrested for refusing to surrender her seat on a Montgomery, Ala., bus to a white man.  A subsequent year-long boycott and protest by the NAACP resulted in a federal court ruling that the city?s segregation ordinance was unconstitutional.  The demonstration is credited with fueling the modern civil rights movement in America.

            The scholarship foundation was inaugurated in 1980 by The Detroit News and the Detroit school system in tribute to Mrs. Parks on the 25th anniversary of her historic protest.

            The foundation has since awarded scholarships of $2,500 each to nine Parks Scholars selected from among Michigan high school graduates.

            Mrs. Adams is director of programs for the Detroit-Wayne County Community Mental Health Board.  She teaches Sunday school at Detroit?s Fellowship Chapel, where she is active in children?s programs.

            Burns, executive editor of The News fills the seat on the board previously held by former Detroit News Editor William Giles, who left the newspaper to become distinguished editor in resident at Michigan State University.

            Rassel is director of the Detroit law firm Butzel, Long, Gust, Klein and Van Zile, and a pioneer supporter of the foundation.

            Warden is a Detroit marketing representative for manufacturers of construction equipment.  He also is a member of the St. Mary?s School Board, Royal Oak.

            Adams and Warden also have been active in a community-based committee of persons recruited early this year to establish funds for future Parks scholarships.  The committee?s fund-raising drive was organized by Bernard Carswell after last year?s scholarship award to his son Christopher, exhausted the fund.

            Other persons active in the committee?s drive to raise funds for this year?s Parks Scholarship include:

            Marcheta Colding, Monet Conner, Limuel Dokes, Voncile Green, Che Karega, Karl Payne, Debra Rhodes, Rickye Ross, Lew Rowe, Velma Sanford, Barbara Smith, Pat Spriggs, Harold Upshaw and Barbara Wood.

            The committee needs the help of persons interested in joining fund-raising programs or in making tax-exempt contributions.

            Contributions or inquiries may be mailed to:  Rosa L. Parks Foundation, care of The Detroit News, 615 W. Lafayette, Detroit 48231.

 

 

 

Mom turns slow learner into scholar

By Yolanda W. Woodlee, News Staff Writer
May 31, 1988

 

            When Anson Asaka couldn?t find the ticking timer hidden in his kindergarten classroom, the teacher decided he was a slow learner ? not ready for the first grade.

            But, his mother, Charllotte, didn?t believe it.  After extensive tests, Charllotte Asaka learned her son suffered from 15 percent hearing loss in both ears and perceptual dyslexia ? an impairment of the ability to see words as they actually appear.

            She persuaded his teacher to pass Anson to the first grade, hired a tutor and spent extra time coaching her son to overcome his handicaps.  He did.

            Anson, who is graduating from Mackenzie High School in June, is one of 22 students to win a Rosa Parks Scholarship for $2,000.  A member of the National Honor Society, vice-president of Senior Congress, and a varsity tennis team player, Anson maintained a 3.48 grade point on a 4.0 scale.

            Rosa Parks scholarships, established by The Detroit News, are awarded to Michigan high school students who emulate the spirit of the civil rights pioneer through academic achievement and community involvement.

            ?I?m excited because (the scholarship) lifts the burden off me,? said Anson, 18, who has been accepted at Howard university, Morehouse College and Tuskegee Institute and estimates his college costs at $8,000 a year.  ?It was a shock.?

            For Anson, his achievements in school were further complicated by a number of overwhelming family problems.  His mother is divorced and became ill six years ago.  She couldn?t pay the rent, and she and her three children were evicted from their home, forcing them to eat in soup kitchens and shop at resale stores.

            Charllotte Asaka, who works for the United Community Housing Coalition finding housing for the homeless, said Anson had to work twice as hard as other school kids.

            While Anson was struggling to overcome his hearing and reading disabilities, his sister Sidnie, now 16, was tested and determined to be a gifted student.  She skipped a grade in school and also will graduate from Mackenzie High next month.

            ?It?s very difficult to finance two children in college,? said Charllotte Asaka, 43.  ?My kids don?t come from a well-off situation.?

            Nevertheless, she taught Anson, Sidnie and their brother, Astere, 12, to strive to make the right choices in life.

            ?When we would eat in soup kitchens, I would tell them we are here because these things happened, but you have choices,? she said.  ?I would take the adversities and turn them into adventures.  I would also put in my kids? heads, ?If we don?t have it, we don?t have it.??

            Anson said he was motivated by the hard times.

            ?I decided I would never eat at a soup kitchen again,? he said.  ?I would be upset and worry about it, but that would give me more fuel to do what I had to do to accomplish my goals.?

            At MacKenzie, Anson?s principal and guidance counselor said he is respected by his teachers and his peers.

            Clearly, his mother was the stabilizing force in his life, Anson said proudly.

            ?My mother has done an excellent job with the resources she had,? he said.  ?If it wasn?t for her mentality about life, I don?t think I would strive for excellence.  I wouldn?t be the same way I am now.  It wasn?t easy.?

            It took four Christmases, but she finally saved enough to buy Anson a computer.  He even attended a parochial high school for two years, working on weekends and after school to help pay his tuition.

            ?They know a lot about life,? Charllotte Asaka said.

            In the soup kitchens, Charllotte Asaka would show her kids people with sores on their bodies and point out the hazards of living on life?s seedier side.  She also exposed them to people who worked hard, lived in nice houses and earned good salaries.

            Even though Anson saw students buy expensive things with money earned from selling drugs, he said he never was tempted to take the easy way out.

            ?Those people have short life spans,: he said.  ?I decided I?d take the long, difficult route rather than a fast route.  I know I will get mine through hard work.?

 

 

Detroit schools raise $15,000 for scholarships

By Denise Crittendon, News Staff Writer
April 11, 1988

 

            Victor Rondeau helped the Detroit Public Schools raise more than $15,000 for the Rosa L. Parks Scholarship Drive.  He did it by flipping pancakes and popping popcorn.

            Rondeau, a 6 year old at Foch Middle School is one of 12 special education students who raised $700 by selling breakfast food, pastries and popcorn balls at school every weekend in March.

            But to Rondeau, who is learning-disabled, the money was just part of the excitement.  It was his first experience as a chef.

            ?It was fun ?cause it was the first time I cooked pancakes,? he said, smiling.  ?I was cooking them so black kids can go to college?

            The public schools collected $15,216, including a $500 donation from the Organization of Classified Custodians.  The money will go to the Rosa L. Parks Scholarship Foundation, which each year awards $2,000 scholarships to several outstanding minority students.

            The state wide fund was started eight years ago by The Detroit News and the Detroit Public Schools to honor Detroiter Rosa Parks.  Parks is a black woman whose quiet determination helped spark the civil rights movement when she was arrested in 1955 for refusing to relinquish her seat on a bus in Montgomery, Ala.

            The foundation has awarded more than 39 scholarships to graduating high school seniors.  The number of scholarships granted each year depends on how much is collected.

 

 

Rosa Park?s 75th Birthday Launches Scholarship Drive

By Krystal Miller and Jim Hill, The Detroit News

February 4, 1988

 

            Today marks the 75th birthday of Rosa L. Parks and the official kickoff of the 1988 scholarship fund drive that commemorates her contributions to the modern civil rights movement.

            The drive, which continues through the end of the month, is designed to raise funds for high school students planning to attend a four-year college or university this fall.

            The scholarship fund, administered by the Rosa Parks Foundation, was established by The Detroit News and the Detroit Board of Education in 1981 to serve as a living memorial to Parks.  The fund has awarded 30 one-year scholarships totaling $68,500 to outstanding high school graduates throughout Michigan.

            Since 1985, The News has sponsored two additional students each year who enroll in the Journalism Institute for Minorities at Wayne State University.

            Jarold Adams, president of the Rosa Parks Scholarship Foundation, said money for the fund is generated primarily from individuals.  However, Detroit?s Stroh Brewery made an $800,000 pledge in 1986.

            Detroit public school students add to the fund each year as well by hosting bake sales, car washes and dances throughout the academic year.  Any Michigan high school senior who will graduate by August 1988 is eligible to apply.

            Scholarship awards are based on academic achievement, financial need, confirmation of admission to a college or university and community service.

            ?The number of scholarships is expanding every year,? said Benjamin Burns, treasurer of the scholarship fund and director of the Wayne State University journalism program.  ?Now the funding is secured although it hasn?t always been that way.?

            In 1982 the foundation fell on hard times and was only able to award one scholarship.  Because of a severe shortage of funds the following year, none were awarded.  This led to a serious re-evaluation of the program, Burns said.  The foundation?s board of directors decided to remove a $100 gift ceiling, allowing for increased donations.

            ?This year we?d like to raise about $30,000 or more which would enable us to give out 15 scholarships or more,? said Adams.  ?We?ve always been able to raise an average of about $10,000 from community donations.

            Parks refused to give up her seat to a white passenger on a racially segregated Montgomery, Ala., bus 32 years ago, touching off the historic bus boycott that is credited with launching the modern civil rights movement.

            Applications for the 1988 scholarships can be obtained by contacting the Guidance Department of any Michigan high school or writing to The Detroit News, P.O. Box 950, Detroit, Mich. 48231.  Tax-deductible contributions are being accepted all year and should be mailed to the Rosa L. Parks Scholarship Foundation at The Detroit News address.

 

 

 

14 Receive Rosa Park Scholarships

By Jim Hill and Krystal Miller, The Detroit News

July 1, 1987

 

Fourteen Michigan high school graduates Tuesday received scholarships totaling $28,000 from the Rosa L. Parks Scholarship foundation at the Renaissance Club in Detroit.

Each year since 1980, scholarships of $2,000 each have been awarded to exceptional minority high school graduates who maintain high grades, are active in their school and community, and have a will to succeed.

The foundation was named after Rosa Parks to honor her contribution to the cause of equality of justice and human dignity in America.  Parks? refusal to give up her seat on a Montgomery, Ala., bus to a white passenger in 1955 helped mobilize the modern civil rights movement.

?It?s so good to see people doing something for our youngsters,? said Parks, now a Detroiter.  ?Even after I?m gone I hope this goes on.?

Ben Burns, chief administrative editor at The Detroit News and secretary/treasurer of the Rosa Parks Scholarship Foundation, said the scholarship program ?will continue on and flourish.?

?I expect next year 25 or more scholarships will be awarded,? Burns said.

The Rosa Park Foundation is funded by the Detroit public schools and The Detroit News.  Stroh?s Brewery, the Classified Custodial Organization, and private donors also contribute to the scholarship?s fund.

Recipients said the scholarships were special because of Rosa Parks.

?I believe to receive a scholarship bearing the name of Rosa Parks is a great honor,? said Renaissance High School graduate Therisa Rogers.

Two other winners, Kimberly Trent and Rhonda Anderson of Cass Technical High School in Detroit received special four-year scholarships to Wayne State University.  At Wayne they will be part of the Journalism Institute For Minorities and receive summer internships at The Detroit News.

 

 

 

Rosa Parks Scholarship Deadline Extended

The Detroit News

Thursday, May 21, 1987

 

            The deadline for Michigan high school seniors to apply for 1987 Rosa L. Parks scholarships has been extended to Tuesday, May 26.

            Twenty-three students from throughout the state have received $2,000 Parks awards since the program was established in 1980 by The Detroit News and the Detroit public schools.

            The Rosa Parks Scholarship Foundation expressed hope the fund would receive enough individual and corporate contributions this year to finance 10 scholarships.

            Scholarship recipients will be announced in June.  In addition, two Detroit News-funded Rosa Parks Scholarships of $2,000 each will be given to students who will be enrolled next fall in the Journalism Institute for Minority Students at Wayne State University.  The program is designed to recruit and train minority students for careers in mass communications.

            The scholarship program is designed to honor the courage of Rosa L. Parks, who refused to give up her seat to a white passenger on a bus in defiance of a Montgomery, Ala., segregation law.  Her action helped spark the civil rights movement of the 1950s and 1960s.  Parks now lives in Detroit.

            To be eligible for the scholarships, applicants must be high school graduates by next August and have at least a 2.5 grade point average.  They also must provide proof of active participation in civic and community service projects.  Other requirements include three letters of recommendation from a member of the clergy, school representative or a community civic leader, plus a transcript of school records and proof of admission to a college or vocational institution.

            Application forms may be obtained from high schools or the Detroit News, P.O. Box 950, Detroit, Mich., 48231.

 

 

Students Raise $6,042 for Scholarship Fund

The Detroit News

April 24, 1987

 

            Detroit public school students and staff have raised $6,042 for the Rosa Parks scholarship fund offered to high school seniors, a school district spokeswoman said Wednesday.

            The 1987 scholarship fund drive officially ends April 30, spokeswoman Marilyn Shreve said.

            In 1986, $6,985 was raised by the end of April.  The fund totaled $7,338 by May 28, she said.  Five high school seniors were awarded the money to use for their college educations.

            The fund was started in 1980 in honor of Rosa Parks, considered to be the mother of the civil rights movement.  The Detroit News is a sponsor.

 

 

 

Documentary brings sacrifice home to ?81 Rosa Parks Scholar

By Monroe Walker, The Detroit News

March, 30, 1987

 

            Marie L. Miranda remains deeply moved by an event that occurred nine years before she was born.

            Miranda ? a 23-year old Rosa L. Parks scholar ? was watching a television documentary recently which depicted the beginning of the civil rights movement in 1955.

            The film showed a tired Rosa L. Parks refusing to give up her bus seat to a white passenger in Alabama.

            Mrs. Parks defiance resulted in her arrest and payment of $14 in fines and court costs.  It also sparked demonstrations and boycotts that eventually ended racial segregation on buses in the South.

            Miranda, born nine years after Mrs. Parks historic stand, saw on television for the first time the reality of Rosa Parks? contribution to human rights.

            ?It reaffirmed my commitment to ideals of Mrs. Parks,? she said.  ?I don?t know if I could have done it but I hope that in my own way I can also help others.?

            Miranda, who was awarded a Rosa L. Parks Scholarship in 1981, received a bachelor?s degree in economics and mathematics from Duke University in 1985 and is currently completing three years of graduate study at Harvard University.

            She plans to work in one or more of the developing countries in economic development after she earns her doctorate next year at Harvard.

            Miranda was among eight original Rosa Parks scholars who received awards in 1981 from the scholarship program sponsored jointly by The News and Detroit public schools.

            The scholarship program was established in 1980 to mark the 25th anniversary of Rosa Parks? act of defiance.

            Since then, 23 graduating Michigan high school seniors have received Rosa Parks scholarships.

            In 1982, hard times and tight money allowed only one student to be awarded a scholarship and no awards were made the following year.

            However, in 1984 three more scholarships were awarded after The Detroit News asked the board of directors be reshaped and it removed the $100 gift ceiling to allow for increased individual and corporate contributions.  The plan worked, and the fund began to attract larger donations, resulting in four awards being made in 1985 and seven being awarded last year.

            Recipients of the 1987 scholarships will be announced in June.  In addition, two Detroit News-funded Rosa Parks Scholarships of $2,000 each will go to students who will be enrolled next fall in the Journalism Institute for Minority Students at Wayne State University.

            The Wayne State program is designed to recruit and train minority students for careers in mass communications.  The institute is financed by local media contributions and scholarships are awarded by Wayne State.

            Information about the 1987 scholarship program ? how to obtain applications and the deadline for returning them ? will be announced soon.  Meanwhile, contributions are currently being accepted.

 

 

Annual Rosa Parks Scholarship Fund Drive Launched

By Don Tschirhart, The Detroit News

February 23, 1987

 

            Thirty-two years ago Rosa L. Parks refused to give up her seat on a Montgomery, Ala., bus to a white passenger.

            Her defiance resulted in her arrest and payment of $14 in fines and court costs.  But her determination sparked a demonstration and boycott that ended racial segregation on buses and helped change the face of the nation with the birth of the civil rights movement.

            For the sixth year The Detroit News and the Detroit public schools are jointly sponsoring the Rosa Parks Scholarship Fund drive to honor the civil rights leader and to raise money to send graduating Michigan high school students to college.

            Already 23 high school graduates have received the scholarships.

            The first fund drive in 1981 sent eight young men and women to college after students helped raise money by washing cars, conducting bake sales and holding dances.  In 1982, hard times and tight money allowed only one student to be awarded a scholarship and no awards were made the following year.

            However, in 1984, three more scholarships were awarded after The Detroit News asked that the board of directors be reshaped and the board removed the $100 gift ceiling to allow for increased individual and corporate contributions.

            The plan worked and the fund began to attract larger donations, resulting in four scholarships being awarded in 1985 and seven last year.

            Recipients of the 1987 scholarships will be announced in June.  In addition, two Detroit News-funded Rosa Parks scholarships of $2,000 each will go to students who will enroll next fall in the Journalism Institute for Minority Students at Wayne State University.

            The WSU program is designed to recruit and train minorities for careers in mass communications.  The institute is financed by local media contributions and scholarships are awarded by Wayne State.

            Information about the 1987 scholarship program ? how to obtain applications and the deadline for returning the applications ? will be announced shortly.

 

 

 

College in cards for prep scholars

7 students are granted Rosa Parks scholarships

By Monroe Walker, News Staff Writer

June 6, 1986

 

            Detroit Mayor Coleman A. Young may not know it yet, but 18-year-old Anthony Rome is after his job.

            Rome, a Detroit Cass Technical High School senior and Rosa L. Parks scholar, said Thursday he wants to be mayor of Detroit.  But the 68-year-old Young can relax ? Rome says he won?t run before 1990.

            One of seven Metro Detroit high school senior who received $2,000 Parks scholarhips Thursday at an awards luncheon in the Detroit Press Club, Rome plans to attend Michigan State University this fall and major in political science.

            Scholarship officials, acknowledging past fund-raising problems, say an $850,000 Stroh Brewery endowment should accommodate future financial needs.

            Mrs. Parks, 73, who attended the luncheon, urged the winners to strive to achieve their goals and ?work to make changes.?

            Others receiving scholarships were Krystal Miller, 18 of Detroit?s Mumford High School; Joann R. Brooks, 17, of Royal Oak Shrine High School; James Hill, 17, of Hamtramck High School; Nyeleti Hudson, 18, of Flint Northwestern High School; Clarence E. Leggs Jr., 17, of Cass Technical High School, and Sandra T. Blevins of Detroit?s Central High School.  Forty-one students applied.

            Winners were selected on the basis of scholarship, leadership and dedication to the principles of Mrs. Parks, who sparked the civil-rights movement of the 1950s and 1960s by refusing in 1955 to give up her bus seat to a white passenger in Montgomery, Ala.

            The scholarship fund, sponsored jointly by The Detroit News and the Detroit public school system, was established in 1980 to honor the 25th anniversary of Mrs. Parks? historic stand.  The program has sent 16 Michigan high school seniors to college.  Seven already have graduated.

            Two of the 1986 recipients, Hall and Miss Miller, were awarded renewable four-year scholarships to the Wayne State University Journalism Institute for Minorities.  They join two other student selected for the program last year.  Eight Rosa Parks scholars are expected to participate by 1988.

            ?Stroh Brewery has committed $850,000 to the Rosa L. Parks Scholarship Foundation,? said Richard Rassel, a fund trustee.  ?The first infusion of $250,000 will be received in September and the rest spread over a three-year period.  That will ensure that this scholarship program will not only survive but also will grow.?

 

 

Poster sales will boost Parks Scholarship Fund

The Detroit News, February 27, 1986

 

            A poster depicting five black Nobel Prize laureates is being sold under a special program by The Detroit News and the Museum of African American History to help raise money for the Rosa L. Parks Scholarship Fund, which provides Michigan students with college tuition.

            Pictured are Dr. Ralph J. Bunche, Albert John Lithuli, the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr., Sir Arthur Lewis, and Bishop Desmond M. Tuto.

            The $15 posters are available for only $13 if you present the Nobel Peace Prize coupon below at the Museum of African American History, 1553 W. Grand Blvd., or The Detroit News, 615 W. Lafayette.  Framed posters (originally $50 each) are $48 with the coupon.  Five dollars from each poster sale will go to the Rosa L. Parks Scholarship Fund.

            Contributors also have a chance to win one of 30 other prizes, such as desk clocks and duffel bags.

            Contributions should be mailed to The Rosa L. Parks Scholarship Foundation, P.O. Box 950, Detroit 48231

           

 

 

 

Fund drive begins for special breed ? Rosa Parks scholars

By Monroe Walker, News Staff Writer
February 13, 1986

 

            Rosa L. Parks scholars are a special breed of college students, who have academic ability and are motivated by high ideals of equality and human dignity, according to Detroit Schools Supt. Arthur Jefferson.

            ?Because the cost of education is so prohibitive, scholarships means a great deal to those who have ability but lack financial resources,? Jefferson said.  ?Secondly, because it?s a Rosa Parks scholarship ? and realizing what she has meant to this nation in striving for equality and human dignity ? I would suspect those recipients had an added dimension.  They want to carry on, in their own way, the traditions of Mrs. Rosa Parks.?      

            Mrs. Park, 73, often is called the ?mother of the civil rights movement? for her historic stand against racial discrimination in 1955 in Montgomery, Ala.  She helped spark the nation-wide struggle against racial injustice in the 1960s and 1970s by refusing to give up her bus seat to a white passenger.

            In 1980, a scholarship program, sponsored jointly by The Detroit News and the Detroit Public Schools, was established to mark the 25th anniversary of her historic stand.

            Since the program began, 16 graduating high school seniors have received Rosa Parks scholarships and seven already have graduated from college.

            The 1986 scholarship fund drive to send graduating seniors to college is under way and this year contributors will be eligible for one of 30 prizes being offered by The News.

            They include desk clocks, insulated jackets, hooded sweatshirts and duffel bags to be awarded in a drawing at the conclusion of the drive.

            Jefferson, a trustee of the Rosa L. Parks Scholarship Foundation, said recently that students who receive such scholarships join a ?unique group.?

            ?You?re talking about one of a select group of individuals,? he said.  ?There are many scholarships available but only one Rosa Parks scholarship fund and that should be a motivating force.?

            He said high school seniors in Michigan who will graduate in June may apply, but ?but they must be motivated not only by the money but also by the ideals of Mrs. Rosa Parks.?

            He said members of the scholarship committee were working to expand the program.

            ?I can?t say what the future will hold, but the foundation is working very hard to create an endowment,? he said.  ?We want to expand and be able to award more scholarships.?        

            ?We have a Rosa Parks Scholarship fund and we want to make sure we perpetuate that fund,? he said.  ?we?re fortunate in having her in Detroit and the state of Michigan.  This (fund) shows how much we appreciate the steps she took to enlarge freedom and dignity for all of us.  That?s why we think this is so important.?

            Jefferson urged individuals and corporations in Michigan to contribute to the scholarship fund.

            ?I?d like to point out that all of the funds go for scholarships,? he said.  ?Sometimes people say they empathize and that they would help if there was some way.  Well, here?s a way.?

            Contributions should be mailed to the Rosa L. Parks Scholarship Foundation, P.O. Box 950, Detroit, 48231.

 

 

Rosa Parks scholars set their sights high

By Mike Wowk, News Staff Writer

June 11, 1985

 

Angela Greene, 17, has mapped her career plans for the next 10 years as assuredly as another might describe an upcoming vacation.

I?m going to Howard University and get a degree in mechanical engineering, then I?ll get a master?s in international business,? said the Cass Technical High School senior from Detroit.

Eventually, I want to set up my own engineering firm.  I want to be an environmental consultant and work on alternative energy sources.?

Miss Greene?s combination of self confidence, ambition and talent is typical of the four winners of this year?s Rosa Parks Scholarships.  The program was established in 1980 by The Detroit News and Detroit public schools to provide financial aid to outstanding local high school graduates.

The other scholars are Jeanette Bryant of Oak Park High School, who will enroll in Wayne State University; Darrell Dawsey of Detroit Southeastern High School, who is also going to Wayne State; and Kam Roberts of New Haven High School, who is enrolling in GMI Engineering and Management Institute.

Miss Bryant and Dawsey will receive $2,000 scholarships, renewable for each of the following three years, to study in WSU?s new Journalism Institute for Minorities.  Their scholarships are provided by The News.

Miss Greene and Miss Roberts will receive one-time scholarships of $2,000 each from the Rosa Parks Scholarship Fund, which depends upon private donations from individuals and organizations.

The scholarships are named for the acclaimed ?mother of the civil rights movement,? who was arrested in 1955 for refusing to give up her seat on a segregated bus in Montgomery, Ala.

A Detroit resident for many years, Mrs. Parks spoke to the 1985 scholarship winners at a luncheon in their honor last week.

?Young people came out in large numbers to support us (during the subsequent Montgomery bus boycott),? Mrs. Parks recalled.  ?I?ve always remembered that, so I?m very happy to do what I can to encourage students like yourselves.?

Two suburban students ? Miss Bryant and Miss Roberts ? are scholarship winners because the program, once limited to Detroit students, was opened this year to any Michigan high school senior.

Miss Bryant, who plans to study journalism, has already had extensive high school experience.  She is features editor of her high school newspaper and co-editor of its literary magazine and yearbook.

            Miss Bryant has won two writing awards from the Detroit Free Press, another from the Michigan Interscholastic Press Association and a scholarship last summer to an urban journalism workshop at Olivet College.

Like the others, she mines no words about her future plans.

?I want to work for a large newspaper and eventually become a columnist,? Miss Bryant said.  ?I want to become a journalist because it offers a unique challenge to me.?

Miss Roberts, who plans to study electrical engineering, is valedictorian of her graduating class at New Haven.  Her high school activities included band, volleyball, cheerleading and the student council.

A college scholarship is important to her, Miss Roberts wrote on her application, because of her financial need.  ?My father is 71 years old and is on a fixed income.

?I?ve always liked math and science,? Miss Robert said.  ?And I love challenges.  If I didn?t challenge myself, I?d be bored.  I think engineering will be an excellent springboard to my career.?

Dawsey had planned to attend Indiana University this fall.  But Luther Keith, as assistant news editor at The News on leave to WSU?s minorities journalism institute, persuaded him to enroll in his program instead.

?I went after Darrell Dawsey the way a basketball coach goes after a recruit,? Keith said.  ?I?m not interested in running a remedial program.  It?s important that our program set high standards and that?s why I wanted to get outstanding students like Darrell and Jeanette.?

An all-city football halfback at Southeastern, Dawsey is his class salutatorian and senior editor-publisher of the school newspaper.

He has placed first or second in four local oratorical contests and has been awarded $5,000 in scholarships from Detroit?s black McDonald?s restaurant operators.

?I want to be the best writer in the country,? Dawsey said.  ?I?m interested in writing both sports and straight news for a newspaper, but I?m leaning toward sports right now.?

Like the others, Miss Greene has been very active in her high school.  Among other projects, she negotiated with various travel agencies to organize Cass Tech senior class trips to Florida, the Bahamas and Atlanta.

A Cotillion Club debutante, she has also been Sunday school secretary and an assistant clerk in her church and recently volunteered hundreds of hours of service for the American Cancer Society.

She picked Washington?s Howard University, she said, because ?I felt I?d get special attention at a black college.?

 

 

 

Graduation time

Original Rosa Parks scholars go a long way

By Chester Bulgier, News Staff Writer

May 6, 1985

 

Marie Lynn Miranda received a double-major bachelor?s degree from Duke University and has just been awarded a National Science Foundation grant for three years of graduate study, which she will take at Harvard.

            Cassandra L. Tribble graduates next Saturday from Howard University and will go on to medical school, possibly at Wayne State University.

            They are among the eight original Rosa L. Parks scholars, Detroit area high school graduates who received $2,500 scholarships when The Detroit News and the Detroit public school system set up the program in 1981.

            Two more will graduate from other colleges this spring and the remaining four are still working on their bachelors? degrees.

            Although $2,500 doesn?t go far in these days of escalating tuition, all eight scholars credit the Parks grants with helping them get a toehold on a college career.

            The program was established as a tribute to Mrs. Parks? historic stand against racial discrimination in 1955.  This year it expanded its scope to make all Michigan high school seniors eligible to apply.

            Here?s how the original eight are faring:

§      Jill R. Austin, 20, of Romulus ? She is a senior at Oakland University and hopes to get her degree in business administration next spring.  She is in a cooperative education program with Michigan Bell Telephone Co., attending school for one semester and working the next in the telephone company?s personnel department.

§      Lawrence C. Bradley, 21, of Detroit. ? He plans to graduate next spring from Michigan State University with a degree in electrical engineering.  He has held campus jobs during the school year and works summers as a junior engineer for General Motors Corp.

§      Peter D. Cook, 21, of Oak Park ? He graduates this spring from Harvard University with a major in visual and environmental studies. Cook plans to work for a Boston architectural firm for a year, and then to decide whether to continue his education on a graduate level.  He works in the library at the university?s graduate School of Design, and recently received a Cooper-Hewitt Museum Fellowship from the Smithsonian Institution.  For the past two summers Cook has worked for Capital Cities Communications at WJR and Omnicom Cablevision, and he has served as news director of the Harvard station, WHRB.

§      Lisa T. Cooper, 20, of Detroit ? She will grade June 20 from Dartmouth College in New Hampshire, with a major in anthropology and a minor in premedical studies.  She plans to go to medical school and will decide among the University of Michigan, Harvard and the University of Chicago.  Miss Cooper is working this term as a laboratory technician in a Boston hospital.  She also won a scholarship from the Dartmouth Parent Club and has received scholarships each year from the college.  She works as a camp counselor in the summer.

§      Joseph G. DeMelis, 22, of Lincoln Park ? He will receive his degree in business administration next December at Michigan State university, after changing his major from science to business logistics.  He works summers at Michigan Mutual Life Insurance Co. and has headed an intramural sports program at MSU.

§      Marie L. Miranda, 21, of Detroit ? Her double degree from Duke, in Durham, N.C., is in economics and mathematics.  She plans to work in one or more of the developing countries, in a field of economic development; after she earns her doctorate at Harvard.  To accept the National Science Foundation scholarship, she had to pass up a Marshall Scholarship for two years of study in England.  She also received Duke?s Leadership Award.

    So far, Miss Miranda also has won a $12,000 grant from the Shell Oil Co. Century III Leaders Program, a $1,000 Presidential Award from President Reagan, a four-year Truman Foundation scholarship for $5,000 a year, a $1,000 award from the Michigan Legislature, another $1,000 from the National Merit Scholarships Foundation and a ?free ride? on four years of tuition at Duke, worth $26,000.

    She has been a consultant to Educational Testing Services for two years.  She worked last summer on a forestry project in Nepal and the previous summer as a Peace Corps recruiter in Detroit.  This summer she will be employed by the U.S. Forest Service.  She also is board chairman of a small educational corporation promoting international awareness for high schoolers.  She has been manager of the Duke basketball team for three years.

§      Cassandra L. Tribble, 21, of Detroit ? She graduates next Saturday, majoring in premedical studies and microbiology.  She has been accepted at several medical schools, including WSU, but has not decided which to attend.  A member of the National Honor Society, she received a four-year science scholarship for her undergraduate years at Howard.  She also has worked for two years in cancer research programs at the National Institute of Health in Washington, D.C.  She plans to specialize in anaesthesiology.

§      David E. Ward, 21, Westland ? He attended Alma College for a year.  Since them he has been working and taking courses at Schoolcraft College.  He plans to enter Wayne State University next fall and to resume on his mechanical engineering degree.

 

 

Rosa Parks program open to all

The Detroit News
April 28, 1985

 

            The Rosa Parks Scholarship program, established in 1980, has expanded to include all Michigan high school seniors.  The equal opportunity scholarships program had been limited to Detroit area students.

            Graduating seniors may apply for the grants by writing to Rosa Parks Scholarships Fund, The Detroit News, P.O. Box 950, Detroit, MI., 48231.  Completed applications must be received by May 17.

            Winners will be selected on the basis of scholarship, leadership and dedication to the civil rights principles of Detroiter Rosa Parks.

 

 

Videotape makes a pitch in Parks scholarship drive

By Armand Gebert, News Staff Writer

February 17, 1985

 

            Three Detroiters are issuing a joint call, by means of a three-minute color videotape, to Michigan?s corporate representatives and leaders to invest in the state?s youth and future leaders by contributing generously to the Rosa Parks Scholarship Fund.

            The appeal for large, tax-deductible contributions, ranging from $1,000 to $5,000, is being made by Dr. Arthur Jefferson, Detroit schools superintendent; civil rights activist Rosa Parks for whom the educational project is named and Theda Martin, one of last year?s scholarship recipients.

            A fund committee headed by Leonard S. Krugel, C.P.A. is seeking appointments to present the film in company board and conference rooms throughout Michigan.

            ?In addition to the comparatively smaller contributions from individuals,? Krugel said, ?a strong corporate base is vital for the program in order to meet the $25,000 goal which will provide $2,500 scholarships to 10 graduating high school seniors.?

            The Detroit News and the Detroit Public Schools have been co-sponsoring the program since 1980.

Jefferson said this appeal for support is part of his message in the videotape.  ?It?s (the scholarship program) an important effort designed to assist deserving students pursue higher educations,? he said, ?educations and careers which might not be possible without such help.  We need the corporate sponsors.? 

A Detroit resident, Mrs. Parks bolsters Jefferson?s remarks and on the videotape tells prospective audiences of her pride for having the program named in her honor.  She was arrested in 1955 in Montgomery, Ala., for refusing to relinquish her seat to a white man on a segregated bus.  Her decision is credited with sparking the modern civil rights movement.

 

 

Rosa Parks Fund to give $2,000 scholarships to 3

The Detroit News

April 1984

 

Three high school seniors will be recipients of $2,000 scholarships each from the Rosa Parks Scholarship program this year, it was announced by Jarold Adams, president of the program's board of trustees.  

Two of the scholarships donated by The Detroit News, will go to students attending the Journalism Institute for Minorities, a Wayne State University program designed to recruit and train minority students for careers in mass communications.

Luther A. Keith, an assistant news editor of The News, is on loan as director of the WSU program with responsibility for recruitment, counselling, curriculum planning, internship placement, career guidance and fund-raising.

"The two Rosa Parks scholarships for students attending the Minority Institute at Wayne State University are among the ways The Detroit News shows its commitment to the spirit of Rosa Parks and development of talented reporters and editors," said Benjamin J. Burns, executive editor of The News.

Graduating high school seniors may apply for the scholarships by writing to Rosa Parks Scholarship Fund, The Detroit News, P.0. Box 950, Detroit, Michigan. 48231. Completed applications must be received by May 17.

The Rosa Park Scholarship program, established in 1980, had been limited to Detroit area students. Now the equal-opportunity scholarships are open to all Michigan high school seniors. Winners will be selected on the basis of scholarship, leadership and dedication to the civil rights principles of Detroiter Rosa Parks.

The scholarships are a tribute to Mrs. Parks' historic stand against racial prejudice in Montgomery, Ala., where she was arrested 1955 when she refused to relinquish her seat on a bus to another passenger.

The scholarships are financed by private contributions and the number provided depends on the amount of donations.

 

 

Student to raise funds for Parks scholarships

The Detroit News

April 24, 1984

 

            The Rosa L. Parks Scholarship Fund drive enters its second week with contributions lagging, apparently because of the Easter recess for Detroit area schools.

            The drive, co-sponsored by The Detroit News and Detroit Public Schools, is seeking to raise funds to award at least two Detroit area school students scholarships of $2,500 each.

            Detroit students will be involved in a number of fund-raising activities for the drive when they return to school next week.

            The fund was formed in 1980 to commemorate the 25th anniversary of Mrs. Parks? historic role in triggering the modern civil rights movement.  She refused to give up her seat to a white man on a bus in Montgomery, Ala., and was arrested.  The bus boycott that ensued is credited with sparking the civil rights demonstrations of the 1960s and 1970s.

            Since the fund was created, nine Detroit area high school students have been awarded scholarships of $2,500 each.  Awardees, who will be announced in June, will be chosen on the basis of academic excellence and civic involvement.  All candidates must be 1984 high school graduates.

            Donations are being sought from individuals, community groups and corporations.

            Donors of $5 or more will have their names published in The News.

            For $3.50, donors can receive a copy of 1983 News special reprints on Africa and Black History Month.  For $7, donors can receive both reprints.

            The Africa series was written by News columnist Al Stark and covers his travels and impressions of the country and its people.  The black history reprint is a collection of nearly 30 articles, covering many phases of black life and culture in Detroit.

            Donations should be sent to the Rosa Parks Scholarship Fund, P.O. Box 950, Detroit, MI 48231.

 

 

Scholarship fund plans fashion show

The Detroit News

August 4, 1983

 

            The Friends of the Rosa Parks Scholarship Committee will hold a cocktail fashion show at Pontiac?s O.J.?s Lounge on Sunday, August 14.

            The show will run from 5 to 9 p.m. and tickets are $4 in advance; $5 at the door.  The lounge is at 484 Auburn Ave.

            The Rosa Parks Scholarship sponsored by The Detroit News, awards grants to academically gifted students in honor of Rosa Parks, the civil rights leader who sparked the bus boycott in Montgomery, Ala., and who now lives in Detroit.

 

 

Cass graduate is Parks scholar

Detroiter, 17, a U-M student, gets $2,500 grant

The Detroit News

October 3, 1982

 

This year?s Rosa L. Parks Scholarship goes to Christopher B. Carswell, a Detroit Cass Technical High School graduate.

Carswell, 17, of Detroit, was selected by a committee for the Rosa L. Parks Scholarship Foundation to receive a $2,500 education grant from among nearly 200 Michigan high school graduates.

Carswell already is studying for a degree in engineering at the University of Michigan.

?The Rosa L. Parks Scholarship appealed to me because it was the only one I could find based on more than simply grades and need," said the young freshman. "I still can't believe this is happening. I got a message at school, called home and my brother told me I won. It was the furthest thing from my mind. And mom was in tears."

Through her tears of happiness, Mrs. Anne Carswell, a Detroit schools biology teacher, explained that she tried to get her son to add more information to his application "but he thought what he wrote was fine."

His responses to a questionnaire reflected streamlined writing skills he learned in a technical writing course he took at U-M Dearborn while still at Cass.

Carswell enjoys drawing and playing ?pickup? basketball games whenever he can.  He is also an active member of Fellowship Chapel of Detroit where he is an usher and the only youth worship leader at Fellowship Chapel.  As a president of the church?s youth organization, Carswell serves as the only youth member of the church?s official board.

He also is a member of the National Honor Society and graduated with honors from his school?s industrial engineering technology curriculum.

The. Rosa L. Parks Scholarship Fund was established by The Detroit News and Detroit public schools in tribute to Mrs. Parks on the 25th anniversary of her historic arrest in 1955, for her refusal to surrender a seat to a white man on a segregated bus in Montgomery, Ala.

The arrest sparked a boycott that ended racial segregation of the public transit system and gave birth to the modern civil rights movement in America.

 

 

Competition helps Rosa Parks fund

By Karl Payne, News Staff Writer

April 4, 1981

 

            ?It was the competition,? says Principal LeRoy Rice, that made Cary Elementary School students a smashing success at raising money for the Rosa L. Parks Scholarship Fund.

            With the help of parents and the school staff, youngsters at the southwest Detroit school gave a total of $400 to the fund.

            The money was raised selling cupcakes, popcorn, used books and by returning beverage container for deposits, said Lawrence Burrell, Cary?s staff coordinator.

            Cary?s students picked the Rosa Parks Scholarship Fund as a community-involvement project after studying about the civil rights movement during February?s Black History Month.  They completed the project yesterday with a program of gospel songs and a dramatic re-enactment of Rosa Parks? historic bus ride in 1955.

            Mrs. Parks, now a Detroiter, is the woman who challenged a law requiring racial segregation of public transportation in Montgomery, Ala., by refusing to surrender her seat on a bus to a white passenger.  Her subsequent arrest sparked a year-long boycott of the city?s transit system which brought repeal of the segregation law and inspired the birth of the modern civil rights movement in America. 

            The scholarship fund was inaugurated by The Detroit News and Detroit Public Schools in tribute to Mrs. Parks? contribution to the cause of equal justice and human dignity.  The scholarship will be an equal-opportunity grant of educational assistance to college-bound Michigan students.

            The scholarship is being funded entirely through gifts from individuals and organizations sharing in the desire to preserve the spirit of Mrs. Parks.  Those who wish to contribute to the fund may send a check or money order to:  The Rosa L. Parks Scholarship Fund, care of The Detroit News, 615 W. Lafayette, Detroit 48231.

 

 

Disco dancers step up fund for Rosa Parks

By Karl Payne, News Staff Writer
March 20, 1981

 

            The Rosa Parks Scholarship Fund found new supporters in the disco crowd that jam-packed the Perfect Blend Lounge in Southfield two nights ago.

            Proceeds from the $3 admission, a total of $348, went entirely to the scholarship fund, thanks to Hank Williams, program director for radio station WLBS-FM, which promoted and sponsored the benefit.

            The scholarship fund was inaugurated by The Detroit News and Detroit Public Schools last December to honor Mrs. Rosa Parks? contribution to the cause of equality of justice and human dignity in America.

            Mrs. Parks returned to her Detroit home this week from a 10-day hospital stay, reportedly recovering from a recent illness.

            She is the woman who, on December 1, 1955 defied an ordinance in Montgomery, Ala., calling for racial segregation of public transportation by refusing to surrender her seat to a white passenger on a bus.  Her arrest for violating the ordinance ignited a year-long boycott of the transit system which brought repeal of the ordinance and mobilized the modern civil rights movement.

            The scholarship fund is supported through the public gifts of individuals, community groups, organizations and corporations.  The names of contributors have been published monthly in The News.

            The scholarship will be an equal-opportunity award of educational assistance to Michigan college-bound students who have demonstrated a dedication to service and the cause of civil rights.  Application procedures and academic requirements will be announced before the end of the school year by a committee now being formed by Detroit Schools and The News.

            To contribute to the fund send a check or money order to: The Rosa Parks Scholarship Fund, care of The Detroit News, 615 West Lafayette, Detroit 48231.

 

 

Black History Month lifts Rosa Parks? fund

The Detroit News

March 18, 1981

 

            Public contributions to the Rosa L Parks Scholarship Fund during February?s black history observance brought the fund to $14,500, an increase of nearly 50 percent over the $10,000 donated by the end of January.

            More than half of the increase, $2,500, was donated by Highland Park Community Schools.

            In a two-week fund-raising blitz, students from the district?s community college and nine public schools competed for school trophy plaques that were awarded to the elementary, middle and high school classes which raised the largest sum.  Winners were Liberty Elementary and Ferris Middle schools and the business education class of Highland Park Community High School.

            Two Detroit elementary schools, Goodale and Bellevue, also raised substantial contributions to the fund through activities tied to Black History Month programs.

            Pledges to the scholarship fund included benefit events planned for this month by WLBS Radio and by the LaVice and Company Theatre Group of Detroit.

            WLBS radio will sponsor a scholarship fund benefit as it hosts the dining and disco crowd at the Perfect Blend, 24901 Northwestern Highway, Southfield, on Wednesday, March 18.  The station?s news director, Hank Williams Jr. (no relations to the country singer) has pledged all door proceeds from that night?s patrons to the fund.

            The LaVice and Company Theatre Group has pledged half the proceeds of a performance of Citrius and Nio to the scholarship fund.  The benefit performance will be presented at 5 p.m. Sunday, March 29, at the Sacred Heart Seminary, 2701 W. Chicago.

            The scholarship fund was inaugurated by The Detroit News and Detroit public schools as a tribute to Mrs. Rosa Parks on the 25th anniversary of her contribution to the modern civil rights movement in America.

            Mrs. Parks, a Detroiter since 1957, became a symbol of the struggle of black Americas to gain equality of opportunity and justice when, in 1955, she challenged an ordinance in Montgomery, Ala., that required racial segregation of public transportation.

            Her arrest for refusing to surrender her bus seat to a white passenger sparked a year-long boycott of the city?s transit system that led to repeal of the ordinance and mobilized the modern civil rights movement.

            The Rosa Parks Scholarship will be an equal opportunity merit award to college-bound Michigan high school students who have demonstrated a dedication to community service and to the cause of equal rights and treatment for all.

            Academic requirements for grants under the scholarship will be set by an advisory committee appointed by Detroit schools.  The requirements will be announced in time for this year?s high-school graduates to apply for the scholarship.  Final guidelines for the scholarship will follow federal requirements to qualify donations for tax-exempt status.

            The News will continue to report community efforts to support the scholarship fund.  The names of all contributors, except those who prefer to remain anonymous, will be published monthly.

            Those who wish to contribute to the fund may mail a check or money order to:  The Rosa L. Parks Scholarship Fund, care of The Detroit News, 615 W. Lafayette Blvd., Detroit 48231.

 

 

Grants to continue her work

Rosa Parks fund enliven memory

The Detroit News, February 9, 1981

 

            In tribute to Detroit?s Rosa L. Parks and her contribution to the struggle for human dignity in America, The Detroit News and Detroit Public Schools have organized an effort to raise public contributions for a scholarship in her honor.

            Mrs. Parks is the woman who took a solitary stand against racial injustice on a segregated bus in Montgomery, Ala. In 1955, refusing to surrender her sear to a white passenger.  A boycott of the bus system followed, giving birth to the modern civil rights movement in America.

            The sprit that aroused Mrs. Parks to take individual action for human dignity has taken many forms since that eventful day in her life 25 years ago.  But the struggle for civil rights continue to need support.

            Funds for the scholarship are being provided by gifts from individuals, organizations, and corporations sharing the desire to advance Mrs. Parks? legacy to the cause of civil rights.

            As many Rosa Parks scholarships as the fund permits will be awarded to college-bound Michigan men and women to exemplify the spirit she symbolizes.

            Up to $100 will be accepted from any individual. Larger gifts will be accepted from groups, organizations and corporations.  The names of all contributors will be published in The News.

            Those who wish to contribute may do so by completing the accompany coupon and mailing a check or money order to:  Rosa Parks Scholarship Fund, The Detroit News, 615 West Lafayette, Detroit, Mich., 48231.

 

 

Kids to dance for Rosa Parks Fund

The Detroit News

January 28, 1981

 

            Collecting money for the Rosa L. Parks scholarship fund means fun for the 670 students at Detroit?s Hampton Elementary School.

            The student council at Hampton is sponsoring an after-school dance for fourth through sixth graders tomorrow.  Not to be outdone, students from kindergarten through third grades will hold a bake sale Tuesday for the same cause.

            Mrs. Parks has promised to visit Hampton later this month.

            She is the black woman who inspired the modern civil rights movement in 1955 when she refused to give up her seat to a white passenger on a segregated bus in Montgomery, Ala.  Her arrest for violation of Montgomery?s segregation ordinance led to a yearlong boycott of the transportation system when ended in repeal of the ordinance.

            To advance the spirit of the movement Mrs. Parks began, The Detroit News and Detroit Public Schools have joined in an effort to establish the scholarship in her honor.

            The scholarship is being financed through gifts from individuals and organizations that share the desire to advance Mrs. Parks? legacy to the cause of civil rights.  Contributions of up to $100 will be accepted from individuals.  Larger gifts will be accepted from groups, organizations and corporations.  The names of all donors will be published in The News.

            Those who wish to contribute may mail a check or money order payable to:  The Rosa Parks Scholarship Fund, The Detroit News, 615 W. Lafayette, Detroit, 28231.

 

 

Kids work hard for Parks fund

By Karl Payne, News Staff Writer

January 16, 1981

 

            Students of Ann Arbor?s Pattengill Elementary School know something about courage.  It took lots of it, plus nervous sighs and wringing of hands, to get through the short speeches a dozen of them made yesterday at the school?s Martin Luther King Jr. assembly.

            Mrs. Mary Wooden, who heads Pattengill?s multiethnic committee, said the assembly capped a week of activity for teachers, parents and the school?s 240 students to raise money for the Rosa L. Parks Scholarship Fund.

            ?Mrs Parks is the black woman who inspired the modern civil rights movement when she was arrested in 1955 for refusing to give up her seat to a white passenger on a segregated bus in Montgomery, Ala.  The arrest led to a yearlong bus boycott, which ended with repeal of the city ordinance requiring segregation of the public transit system.

            In tribute to Mrs. Parks and her commitment to the struggle for human dignity, The Detroit News and Detroit Publish Schools have joined in an effort to establish a scholarship in her honor.

            Ann Arbor?s Pattengill students pledged their donations to the scholarship fund and produced a scroll designed by students.  In brief remarks, students at the assembly explained what each class did to help the effort. 

            Eric MacKenzie, a sixth-grader, said his class baked and sold cupcakes.  Other classrooms sold cookies, brownies, candy and copies of the Pattengill school song.

            Fifth-grader Betsy Bjornstad?s class had success selling ?whatchamacallits? ? grab-bags of surprises.  Richard Klein said his class ?brought stuff from home? to sell at Mrs. Carmen Caruso?s fifth-grade closet sale.

            Jodi Smith, a five-year-old kindergartener, made a final speech.  She explained that her class sold popcorn balls ?because it?s Martin Luther King?s birthday.?

            The scholarship is being assembled from donations from individuals, groups and corporations desiring to advance Mrs. Parks? legacy to the cause of civil rights.  It will be used to provide educational financing to college-bound Michigan men and women who exemplify the spirit she symbolizes.  As many scholarships as the fund permits will be awarded.

            Up to $100 will be accepted from any individual.  Larger gifts will be accepted from groups, organizations and corporations.  Contributors? names will be published in The News.

            Those who wish to contribute may do so by completing the accompanying coupon and mailing a check or money order to:  Rosa Parks Scholarship Fund, The Detroit News, 615 W. Lafayette, Detroit, MI 48231.

 

 

Handicapped donate money to Rosa Parks fund

The Detroit News

January 6, 1981

 

When Mrs. Rosa L. Parks took a solitary stand against racial injustice on a segregated bus in Montgomery, Ala, in 1955, refusing to surrender her seat to a white passenger, a boycott of the bus system followed.  It gave birth to the modern civil rights movement in America.

The spirit that aroused Mrs. Parks to take individual action for human dignity has taken many forms since that eventful day in her life 25 years ago.  And while equality of justice remains a privilege of an elite class of America?s citizens, the struggle for civil rights continues to need the support of its advocates.

The Detroit News and Detroit Public Schools have joined in an effort to raise public contributions to establish a scholarship in tribute to Mrs. Parks and the spirit she has come to symbolize.  The public response to the funding effort would indicate the civil rights movement has many advocates in metropolitan Detroit.

?Thank God for people like Rosa Parks.  I try to live the kind of life that would make a person such as she proud of me.  Being black or white doesn?t matter, being caring and kind does.  She is a real life heroine,? wrote Oak Park donor Harriet Rich.

In a letter with another contribution, Bea Tracy of Mt. Clemens said:  ?In behalf of all the handicappers and other minorities who have benefits by the results of (Rosa Parks) courageous actions, I simply say ?thank you? as no other words, however flowery or profound, could say more.?

The scholarship is being funded with gifts from individuals, organizations and corporations sharing the desire to advance Mrs. Parks? legacy to the cause of civil rights.  As many Rosa Parks scholarship as the fund permits will be awarded to college-bound Michigan men and women who exemplify the spirit she symbolizes.

Up to $100 will be accepted from any individual.  Larger gifts will be accepted from groups, organizations and corporations.  The names of all contributors will be published in The New.

Those who wish to contribute may do so by completing the accompany coupon and mailing a check or money order to: Rosa Parks Scholarship Fund, The Detroit News, 615 W. Lafayette, Detroit, Mich., 48231.

 

 

School joins scholarship drive

The Detroit News

December 14, 1980

 

Ann Arbor?s Pattengill Elementary School has joined the ranks of those helping to finance a scholarship in honor of Rosa L. Parks.

Mrs. Parks earned national prominence for inspiring the modern civil rights movement when she was arrested in 1955 for refusing to let a white man have her seat on a segregated bus in Montgomery, Ala.

In a joint effort to advance the spirit of the movement that she has come to symbolize, The Detroit News and the Detroit Public Schools have joined to finance the scholarships.

In observance of the Jan. 15 birth date of the late Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., the Ann Arbor elementary school?s multiethnic committee has announced that its 240 students will raise money for the Rosa Parks scholarship through bake sales and other activities during the weeklong tribute.

?It?s a week when each school in our district does something to pay recognition to Dr. King.? Said Mrs. Mary Wooden, a member of the Pattengill committee.  ?We think this is an excellent way for us to do so.?

The scholarship fund already has received many contributions and blessings.

?Many thanks to Rosa Parks for her contributions to society,? said a short note sent with a contribution from Roderick Arnold of Detroit.

Despite personal hardships, William Pollard and his wife Lorene, who are retired, both sent individual gifts to the fund and said they wished they could do more.  She is on dialysis in a Detroit hospital.

Contributions of up to $100 will be accepted from individuals.  Larger gifts will be accepted from groups, organizations and corporations.  The names of all donors will be published in The News.

Those who wish to contribute may mail a check or money order payable to the Rosa L. Parks Scholarship Fund, care of The Detroit News 615 W. Lafayette, Detroit 48231.

 

 

Spirit of Rosa Parks is revived

The Detroit News

December 11, 1980

 

Metropolitan Detroiters are showing the value they place on the spirit of the modern civil rights movement with their generous contributions to Mrs. Rosa L. Parks scholarship fund.

She is the woman who, in 1955, distinguished herself when she chose arrest and prosecution over submission to second-class citizenship.  Refusing to surrender her seat on a segregated bus in Montgomery, Ala., the seamstress became a symbol of the struggle for equality.

The scholarship is a joint effort of The Detroit News and the Detroit Public Schools.

?There is only one Rosa Parks; however, I hope this fund will help produce future Americans having her courage and ideals,? said a note accompany a contribution from Mrs. Marion Durrell.

James A. Jaffee wrote that his gift is ?to help America say ?thank you? to Rosa Parks.?

The scholarship fund will be built with gifts from individuals, groups and corporations who share the desire to advance Mrs. Parks? legacy to the cause of civil rights.

Contributions of up to $100 will be accepted from any individual.  Larger gifts will be accepted from groups, organizations and corporations.  The names of all donors will be published in The News.

Those who wish to contribute to the fund may do so by mailing a check or money order payable to the Rosa L. Parks Scholarship Fund, care of The Detroit News, 615 W. Lafayette, Detroit 48231.

 

 

New scholarship fund will honor Rosa Parks

The Detroit News

December 1, 1980

 

            In tribute to Rosa L. Parks on the 25th anniversary of her contribution to the modern civil rights movement, The Detroit News and Detroit public schools announce a joint effort to raise public contributions for a scholarship in her honor.

            Upon successful establishment of the fund, the schools and The News will set up a committee to select people to receive the scholarship.  The money will be used to provide educational assistance to Michigan college-bound men and women who, through scholarship, leadership and dedication to service, exemplify the spirit of Mrs. Parks

            The fund will consist entirely of gifts from corporations, groups and individuals who share a desire to keep her memory alive by providing as many Rosa L. Parks scholars as the fund permits.

            Contributions of up to $100 will be accepted from any individual.  The name of each person who contributes $5 or more will be published in The News.  Larger gifts will be accepted from groups, organizations and corporations.  Their names also will be published.

            Persons wishing to contribute to the fund may do so by mailing a check or money order payable to the Rosa L Parks Scholarship Fund, care of The Detroit News, 615 W. Lafayette, Detroit, MI 48231.